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Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

Category: Bronze Age

Brigid from Goddesses and Heroines By Patricia Monaghan

Probably the clearest example of the survival of an early goddess into Christian times is Brigid (pronounced “breed”), the great triple goddess of the Celtic Irish who appeared as Brigantia in England, Bride in Scotland, and Brigandu in Celtic France.

So entrenched was the devotion of the Irish to their goddess that the Christians “converted” her along with her people, calling her Bridget, the human daughter of a Druid, and claiming she was baptized by the great patriarch St. Patrick himself. Bridget took religious vows, the story went on, and was canonized after her death by her adoptive church, which then allowed the saint a curious list of attributes, coincidentally identical to those of the earlier goddess.

The Christian Bridget, for instance, was said to have had the power to appoint the bishops of her area, a strange role for an abbess, made stranger by her requirement that her bishops also be practicing goldsmiths. The ancient Brigid, however, was in one of her three forms the goddess of smithcraft. Brigid also ruled poetry and inspiration, carrying for this purpose a famous caldron; her third identity was as a goddess of healing and medicine. Not surprisingly, the Christian Bridget was invoked both as a muse and as a healer, continuing the traditions of the goddess.

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Fairy tales origins are thousands of years old, researchers say

Fairy tales like Beauty and the Beast can be traced back thousands of years, according to researchers at universities in Durham and Lisbon, reported BBC News

Using techniques normally employed by biologists, academics studied links between stories from around the world and found some had prehistoric roots.

They found some tales were older than the earliest literary records, with one dating back to the Bronze Age.

The stories had been thought to date back to the 16th and 17th Centuries.

Durham University anthropologist Dr Jamie Tehrani, said Jack and the Beanstalk was rooted in a group of stories classified as The Boy Who Stole Ogre’s Treasure, and could be traced back to when Eastern and Western Indo-European languages split more than 5,000 years ago.

Analysis showed Beauty And The Beast and Rumpelstiltskin to be about 4,000 years old.

And a folk tale called The Smith And The Devil, about a blacksmith selling his soul in a pact with the Devil in order to gain supernatural abilities, was estimated to go back 6,000 years to the Bronze Age.

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The Cauldron of the Dagda – new Celtic book for December 2015

It was with great pleasure that we heard from one of our dear French friends, an author and Bagpiper, Valéry Raydon, when he let us know that he was going to release a book about the famous Cauldron of the Dagda. It is scheduled for release this Christmas by Terre de Promesse. The author was born in Nimes in 1973 and has a doctorate in Ancient History. As well as being an independent researcher, he is the author of several books of illustrated stories, as well as scientific articles and essays on the relationship between the Celtic and Indo-European Mythologies. Errors and inaccuracies in the following translation are purely mine and not those of the author of the book.

“The Cauldron of the Dagda” is the first major study of its kind

The Irish Druid-God the Dagda’s Cauldron of Abundance has long piqued the curiosity of amateurs, Celtic scholars and even professional academics. The scarcity of original sources, as well as the lateness and Christian overlay of any mythological sources that refer to the Cauldron, have meant that no major study has been devoted so far to its divine attributes and meaning as could have been encountered in Gaelic and pre-Christian religious thought, especially about the theology of the god, the Dagda.

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Ancient Irish Horn brought to life by 3D Printing

Billy Ó Foghlú is a PhD student studying archaeology at the Australian National University (ANU) reports the All3DP website. After 3D printing a replica of a Bronze Age artefact, long believed to be a spear butt, he uncovered evidence that it was actually a mouthpiece from an ancient Irish horn.

The artefact, known as the Conical Spear Butt of Navan and found in Ireland in the early 1900s, was likely to have been crafted between 100BC and 200AD.

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