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Tag: Arthurian Myth (Page 3 of 11)

Did King Arthur Really Exist?

King Arthur

King Arthur

Pic: John Hamer

We are proud to bring you a Guest Blog, by co-author & photographer of the book King Arthur – Lord of the Grail (details below). He and his partner Kaye Hennig belive that “Reason will prevail over romance, and legend will become history.” They say that for nearly a thousand years, people have been inspired and entertained by stories, poems, songs, paintings and tapestries about King Arthur, who has become the subject of one of the largest bodies of literature in the world. However, physical evidence has been so lacking as to appear systematically obliterated over the centuries.

Even so, an abundance of truths has preserved in books, and more recently in films, of King Arthur, the Knights of the Round Table, and the Holy Grail. All of these contain elements of truth and clues for those questing for historical facts behind the legends.

The body of Merlinius Ambrosius Dubricius, identified by historian Norma Lorre Goodrich in her book Merlin as the man better known throughout history as “Merlin” was, according to Goodrich, discovered on Bardsy Isle by the Bishop of Llandaff. Goodrich maintains that the Merlin’s body was taken to the cathedral founded by Merlin at Llandaff, Wales. Geoffrey of Monmouth, author of one of the first histories of King Arthur, and an acquaintance of that same twelfth century Bishop of Llandaff, began his famous History of the Kings of Britain in 1120, the same year as the Bishop’s discovery of the body. Geoffrey attributed his source to “a very ancient book written in the British language” (The History of the Kings of Britain, by Geoffrey of Monmouth, Bishop of St. Asaph, translated by Lewis G. M. Thorpe.) Coincidentally, Geoffrey was appointed archdeacon of Llandsaff (sp) in 1140.

Since Geoffrey of Monmouth, non-fiction and fiction writers have researched and written about King Arthur, inspiring readers to search for evidence that might prove the existence of this ancient king and his legendary kingdom. At least three of these writers have made discoveries, and have written about evidence that can still be seen today by those conducting their own grail quest.

Searching for the Scottish Honours

Sir Walter Scott was a prolific poet and novelist. Historical fiction, a genre he helped create and popularize, reflected his keen interest in Scottish history, and his research led him to some major discoveries. He convinced the Prince Regent, later George IV, to search in Edinburgh Castle for the Scottish Honours, the Royal Scottish regalia which had disappeared over a hundred years before. The Honours were subsequently found. Sir Walter used to escort his friends at sunset to Calton Hill in Edinburgh to view below the Salisbury Crags ancient weathered carvings that he thought memorialized King Arthur.

One distinctive sculpted image that may be among those seen by Scott is still visible. It resembles a “helmeted man.” This image was recently re-discovered by Kaye Hennig, author of King Arthur Lord of the Grail, who believes that it was created by the famous Merlin as a memorial to the real King Arthur. This giant head can still be seen quite clearly in the late afternoon on the Salisbury cliffs just across from The Palace of Holyroodhouse car park.

Was Arthur in the Borders Area of Southern Scotland?

The late Dr. Norma Lorre Goodrich was professor emeritus of French and comparative languages at Claremont Colleges in California and the author of four Arthurian books: King Arthur; Guinevere; The Holy Grail; and Merlin. Her research located the territory of the ‘real’ Arthur in the borders area of what is now southern Scotland. She believed that the cave located on the Whithorn Peninsula, now called St. Ninian’s cave, is Merlin’s famous burial cave described by legends as created by request of his Lady of the Lake, Niniane. At this site Goodrich described seeing a burial niche high up on the left side of the ruins of the cave.
St Ninian's Cave

St Ninian’s Cave

Pic: Undiscovered Scotland

Dr. Goodrich and thousands of other visitors to this cave site over the centuries failed to identify remains of ancient art. Rock sculptures and traces of rock paintings are still visible. The images and faded paintings of larger-than-life standing figures in ceremonial attire and large and small chiseled faces of helmeted warriors and beautiful ladies bear an uncanny resemblance to descriptions of legendary Arthurian ancients. Towering above all, forty feet above the floor of the cave, is a rugged crowned head with red beard, strong shoulders, and grey mantle. Over the right shoulder another symbol is still visible, a giant heart-shaped shield with a legendary sword through it.

Those looking for stone sculptures of mythological or historical figures have been conditioned to look for sculptures created in the style of the Greek or Roman sculptors, art that was created in marble that allowed the artist to produce very recognizable human likenesses. The stone at the cave on Whithorn Peninsula is brittle with fissures and does not lend itself well to sculptures. Artisans could cut and chip the stone within the limitations of the rock and tools used to create a likeness but would then be forced to stop as the rock broke in the wrong direction. Unlike the lifelike images of the American presidents carved into cliff in the Black Hills, these ancient sculptures appear quite basic and rough. However, the intent of the Merlin and his artists appeared very clear to the couple who discovered the images. Visitors that plan their walk to the Whithorn cave when late afternoon sunlight casts shadows will find that these are the best conditions for viewing the sculpted stone figures and images.

This recent discovery by author Kaye Hennig and her photographer husband, Terrance, provides dramatic new evidence that may help secure the legendary Arthurians a place in history. Beyond that, the symbols seen in this ancient art could help explain how the Arthurians came to be lost and could provide clues to unravel the mysteries surrounding the legends of the Holy Grail. The couple believes that the ancient art was created inside this burial cave to serve as a record of King Arthur and his Merlin and as memorials to the notables of their legendary lost kingdom.

[http://www.kingarthur-lordofthegrail.com/] Find the book on Amazon

http://discoveryofmerlinscave.wordpress.com/

Author: Terrance Hennig
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Digital Camera Information

Gofannon: Celtic God of Smithcraft and Brewery

091003blacksmith.84193139_stdThe Blacksmith  Pic: Charles Grant Beauregard
A Cymric, Brythonic and Irish God, also known as Goibniu, Gobanos, Gobannus, Cobannus: Great Smith  Gofannon (Goibniu, Gobanos, Gobannus, Cobannus) is a Cymric, Brythonic and Irish god known from the Mabinogi of Math fab Mathonwy and the tale of Culhwch ac Olwen where he forms part of a triad of ‘elder gods’. In Gaul this smith god is known ad Gobanos he is also known from the north of Britain. In Irish mythos he appears as the figure of Goibniu..

Gofannon fab Dôn is known from both the Mabinogi of Math fab Mathonwy and the tale of Culhwch ac Olwen. In Math mab Matholwch he receives little more than a passing mention for his role in the dath of his nephew. Dylan:

Thus was the boy baptized and as they performed the ceremony he sought-out the sea. And in that place when he plunged into the waters he assumed the nature of the nature of the sea and swam as well as the best fish that lived therein. For this reason was he called Dylan Eil Ton. Beneath him no wave ever broke and the blow that brought him death was struck by his uncle, Gofannon. And this was the third unfortunate blow. The tale is fragmentary and how the accident came about is unknown.

In Culhwch ac Olwen one of the tasks that Ysbaddaden Pencawr sets Culhwch the task of ploughing, clearing, seeding and harvesting a hill all in one day.

‘Note, dost thou see that hill yonder?’ Ysbaddaden enquired of Culhwch. ‘I see it,’ Culhwch responded.

‘I require that it be rooted up and that the stumps be burned on the face of the land for manure. It should be ploughed in the morning and must ripen before the dew has left the land. From the harvested grain will I make food and lquor fit for thy wedding with my daughter. And all this should be accomplished within a day.’

‘All this will be easy to accomplish, thou thou may think it is not,’ responded Culhwch.

‘Though this might be easy for thee, there is that which will not be so easy,’ countered Yspydadden. ‘For no husbandman can till or prepare this land, so wild is it, save Amaethon mab Dôn, and he will not come with thee of his own will nor can he be compelled to come.’

‘All this will be easy to accomplish, thou thou may think it is not,’ responded Culhwch once more.

‘Though this might be easy for thee, there is that which will not be so easy. For Gofannon mab Dôn will need to come to the hill to eliminate the iron. He will not work for of his own good will except for a lawful king and you will not be able to compel him.’

This task is accomplished, but the action occurs off-stage as the main tale moves to the far more exciting pursuit for the Twrch Trwyth. There may be a lost fragment of the tale relating to how the hill was ploughed and seeded and this may have to do with Amaethon’s power over the seasons.

Gofannon is part of the triad of elder gods, all the primary sons of Dôn who are Amaethon (Great Farmer), Gwydion (Great of Knowledge) and Gofannon whose name literally means ‘Great Smith’. Though the goddess Dô had other children these were the primary thriad; the triad that denotes her as the mother goddess which is why her offspring are always denoted by the matronymic ‘son/daughter of Dôn.

As the ‘people of iron’ it is only natural that the Celts would have a smith-god as one of their primary deities. Thus we have Gofannon for the insular Brythonic Celts, Goibniu for the Goidelic Celts, and Gobanos (who is known from an inscription found at Berne, Switzerland) for the continental Brythonic Celts. Indeed, the Smith-God was a particularly important member of the Celtic pantheon, as the smith was in Celtic society. For to be able to create strong shining metal from rough ore was seen as an almost magical ability.

To read more visit:  Source

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

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A young face for old Merlin


Pic: BBC
The BBC reports that a host of stars including John Hurt, Michelle Ryan and Richard Wilson are set to appear in BBC One’s latest Saturday night drama, Merlin.

The 13-part series follows the fabled friendship between the young wizard Merlin and Prince Arthur.

Bafta-winner Hurt will provide the voice of Merlin’s mentor, the Great Dragon, while Bionic Woman star Ryan will play wicked sorceress Nimueh.

Newcomer Colin Morgan, 22, from Northern Ireland, takes the title role.

BBC Wales’ Head of Drama Julie Gardner, also an executive producer on Doctor Who, said:

In this new version, Merlin and Arthur are young contemporaries for the first time ever, bringing a much loved tale to a whole new generation with a fresh, youthful new look and approach for Saturday nights

The drama is set in a time before Arthur becomes king, as Merlin comes to terms with his magical powers.

Source

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

From Cauldron to Grail in Celtic Mythology

Celtic Cauldron

Celtic Cauldron

Pic: Sylvantech

The Cauldron is a symbol that occurs throughout Celtic Mythology – from the Cauldrons of the Dagda and Ceridwen to the Holy Grail of King Arthur. In one part of the Mabinogion, which is the cycle of myths found in Welsh legend, Cerridwen brews up a potion in her magical cauldron to give to her son Afagddu (Morfran). She puts young Gwion in charge of guarding the cauldron, but three drops of the brew fall upon his finger, blessing him with the knowledge held within. Cerridwen pursues Gwion through a cycle of seasons until, in the form of a hen, she swallows Gwion, disguised as an ear of corn. Nine months later, she gives birth to Taliesen, the greatest of all the Welsh poets.

The Cauldron of Knowledge

Cerridwen’s magical cauldron held a potion that granted knowledge and inspiration — however, it had to be brewed for a year and a day to reach its potency. Because of her wisdom, Cerridwen is often granted the status of Crone, which in turn equates her with the darker aspect of the Triple Goddess.

As a goddess of the Underworld, Cerridwen is often symbolized by a white sow, which represents both her fecundity and fertility and her strength as a mother. She is both the Mother and the Crone; many modern Pagans honor Cerridwen for her close association to the full moon.

The Cauldron of Bran the Blessed

In the Celtic legend of Bran the Blessed, the cauldron appears as a vessel of wisdom and rebirth. Bran, mighty warrior-god, obtains a magical cauldron from Cerridwen (in disguise as a giantess) who had been expelled from a lake in Ireland, which represents the Otherworld of Celtic lore. The cauldron can resurrect the corpse of dead warriors placed inside it (this scene is believed to be depicted on the Gundestrup Cauldron). Bran gives his sister Branwen and her new husband Math — the King of Ireland — the cauldron as a wedding gift, but when war breaks out Bran sets out to take the valuable gift back. He is accompanied by a band of a loyal knights with him, but only seven return home.
The famous silver Gundestrup Cauldron

The famous silver Gundestrup Cauldron

Pic: Wiki

Bran himself is wounded in the foot by a poisoned spear, another theme that recurs in the Arthur legend — found in the guardian of the Holy Grail, the Fisher King. In fact, in some Welsh stories, Bran marries Anna, the daughter of Joseph of Arimathea. Also like Arthur, only seven of Bran’s men return home. Bran travels after his death to the otherworld, and Arthur makes his way to Avalon. There are theories among some scholars that Cerridwen’s cauldron — the cauldron of knowledge and rebirth — in in fact the Holy Grail for which Arthur spent his life searching. [source]

The Cauldron of the Dagda

In the Mythological Cycle of early Irish literature, the four treasures (or jewels) of the Tuatha Dé Danann are four magical items which the mythological Tuatha Dé Danann are supposed to have brought with them from the four island cities Murias, Falias, Gorias and Findias, when they arrived in Ireland. They were accompanied by the Dagda – Danu’s son by Bile, The Dagdha, or Good God, who is also known as the All Father, Eochaid Ollathair (Father of All), and Ruadh Rofessa (The Red One). One of the fabulous, magical treasures that they brought with them was the Cauldron of the Dagda from which no company ever went away unsatisfied. The cauldron was known as the Undry and was said to be bottomless. Another link between the legends of the Dagda and a Cauldron occurs on the eve of the Second Battle of Magh Tuireadh, The Dagda visited the camp of the Fomorii, where he was forced to eat a huge cauldron stuffed with enough porridge of milk, flour, fat, pigs and goats for fifty men. This test temporarily turned him into a fat old man, but it did not prevent him from making love to a Formorii girl, who promised to use her magic against her people. (See CMP 005 – Girding the Loins for Battle for the story).

The Cauldron of Dyrnwch the Giant

The Black Cauldron

The Black Cauldron

Pic: Dragon’s Breath Blessings

Listed as one of the Thirteen Treasures of Britain, The cauldron (pair) of Dyrnwch the Giant is said to discriminate between cowards and brave men: whereas it would not boil meat for a coward, it would boil quickly if that meat belonged to a brave man. The description probably goes back to a story similar to that found in the Middle Welsh tale Culhwch ac Olwen, in which the cauldron of Diwrnach the Irishman, steward (maer) to Odgar son of Aedd, King of Ireland, is among the anoetheu which Culhwch is required to obtain for the wedding banquet.

King Arthur requests the cauldron from King Odgar, but Diwrnach refuses to give up his prized possession. Arthur goes to visit Diwrnach in Ireland, accompanied by a small party, and is received at his house, but when Diwrnach refuses to answer Arthur’s request a second time, Bedwyr (Arthur’s champion) seizes the cauldron and entrusts it to one of Arthur’s servants, who is to carry the load on his back. In a single sweep with the sword called Caledfwlch, Llenlleawg the Irishman kills off Diwrnach and all his men. A confrontation with Irish forces ensues, but Arthur and his men fight them off. They board their ship Prydwen and, taking with them the cauldron loaded with the spoils of war, return to Britain. In Culhwch, Diwrnach’s cauldron is not attributed with any special power. However, the earlier poem Preiddeu Annwfn (The Spoils of Annwfn), refers to an adventure by Arthur and his men to obtain a cauldron with magical properties equivalent to the one in the lists of the thirteen treasures. In this poem the owner of the cauldron is not an Irish lord but the king of Annwn, the Welsh Otherworld, suggesting that the version of the story in Culhwch is a later attempt to euhemerize an older tale. Diwrnach’s name, which derives from Irish Diugurach and exhibits no literary provenance, may have been selected by the author of Culhwch ac Olwen to emphasize the Irish setting of his story. Although Dyrnwch is not himself described as an Irishman, it is probable that his name goes back to Diwrnach. The extant manuscripts of Tri Thlws ar Ddeg also present such variant spellings as Dyrnog and Tyrnog, without the Irish-sounding ending, but on balance, these are best explained as Welsh approximations of a foreign name.

The Cauldron of Manannan

Manannán mac Lir is a sea deity in Irish mythology. He is the son of the obscure Lir (in Irish the name is “Lear”, meaning “Sea”; “Lir” is the genitive form of the word). He is often seen as a psychopomp, and has strong affiliations with the Otherworld, the weather and the mists between the worlds. He is usually associated with the Tuatha Dé Danann, although most scholars consider him to be of an older race of deities. Manannán figures widely in Irish literature, and appears also in Scottish and Manx legend. He is cognate with the Welsh figure Manawydan fab Llŷr. Manannán was associated with a “cauldron of regeneration”. This is seen in the tale of Cormac mac Airt, among other tales.  Here, he appeared at Cormac’s ramparts in the guise of a warrior who told him he came from a land where old age, sickness, death, decay, and falsehood were unknown (the Otherworld was also known as the “Land of Youth” or the “Land of the Living”).  [wiki]

The Holy Grail – Cauldron of Sovereignty

The Holy Grail is a dish, plate, stone, or cup that is part of an important theme of Arthurian literature. A grail, wondrous but not explicitly “holy,” first appears in Perceval le Gallois, an unfinished romance by Chrétien de Troyes: it is a processional salver used to serve at a feast. Chretien’s story attracted many continuators, translators and interpreters in the later 12th and early 13th centuries, including Wolfram von Eschenbach, who makes the grail a great precious stone that fell from the sky. The Grail legend became interwoven with legends of the Holy Chalice. The connection with Joseph of Arimathea and with vessels associated with the Last Supper and crucifixion of Jesus, dates from Robert de Boron’s Joseph d’Arimathie (late 12th century) in which Joseph receives the Grail from an apparition of Jesus and sends it with his followers to Great Britain. Building upon this theme, later writers recounted how Joseph used the Grail to catch Christ’s blood while interring him and how he founded a line of guardians to keep it safe in Britain. The legend may combine Christian lore with a Celtic myth of a cauldron endowed with special powers.
Sangreal (Arthur Rackham)

Sangreal (Arthur Rackham)

Pic: Wiki

The Holy Grail in the Mabinogion

The Welsh romance Peredur, generally included in the Mabinogion, likely at least indirectly founded on Chrétien’s poem but including very striking differences from it, preserving as it does elements of pre-Christian traditions such as the Celtic cult of the head. Peredur son of Efrawg is one of the three Welsh Romances associated with the Mabinogion. It tells a story roughly analogous to Chrétien de Troyes’ unfinished romance Perceval, the Story of the Grail, but it contains many striking differences from that work, most notably the absence of the French poem’s central object, the grail. The central character of the tale is Peredur, son of Efrawg. As in Percival, the hero’s father dies when he is young, and his mother takes him into the woods and raises him in isolation. Eventually he meets a group of knights and determines to become like them, so he travels to King Arthur’s court. There he is ridiculed by Cei and sets out on further adventures, promising to avenge Cei’s insults to himself and those who defended him. While travelling he meets two of his uncles, the first plays the role of Percival’s Gornemant and educates him in arms and warns him not to ask the significance of what he sees. The second replaces Chrétien’s Fisher King, but instead of showing Peredur a ‘grail’, he reveals a salver containing a man’s severed head. The young knight does not ask about this and proceeds to further adventure, including a stay with the Nine Witches of Gloucester (Caer Loyw) and the encounter with the woman who was to be his true love, Angharad Golden-Hand. Peredur returns to Arthur’s court, but soon embarks on another series of adventures that do not correspond to material in Percival (Gawain’s exploits take up this section of the French work.) Eventually the hero learns the severed head at his uncle’s court belonged to his cousin, who had been killed by the Nine Witches of Gloucester. Peredur avenges his family, and is celebrated as a hero. [wiki]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

King Arthur at Parliament No. 24 – Arthurian Heraldry

Arthurian Arms

Arthurian Arms

Pic: Explore Parliament

This is the 24th and final part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.
The shields which run in a frieze around the Queen’s Robing Room purport to be those of Arthur’s Knights of the Round Table. Shields, each bearing unique arms, originally served the purpose of identifying, during the confusion of battle, the various knights who were concealed under the all-enveloping armour. These eventually became hereditary; and this kind of armorial tradition does not appear much before the 12th century.
Arthurian Arms

Arthurian Arms

Pic: Explore Parliament

Arthurian Arms

Arthurian Arms

Pic: Explore Parliament

However, as early as the sixteenth century it was felt that Arthur’s knights ought to be supplied with coats of arms just like their knightly equivalents of the day, and with the most scrupulous care arms were originated by the College of Arms for the knights of the Round Table. It is these which form the decorative frieze around the Queen’s Robing Room.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

King Arthur at Parliament No. 23 – The Birth of King Arthur in the Castle of Tintagelle

The Birth of Arthur

The Birth of Arthur

Pic: Explore Parliament

Uther Pendragon, father of Arthur, loved Igraine, wife of the Duke of Cornwall. Through the magic of Merlin he visited her in the likeness of her husband who she did not know was dead. She then married Uther, and the child she bore was Arthur.

This is the 23rd part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

‘Sir,’ said she, ‘the same night my lord was dead, there came into my castle of Tintagel a man like my lord in speech and countenance; and thus, as I shall answer unto God, this child was begotten’.
‘That is the truth’, said the king, ‘for it was I myself, and I am father to the child’.
– Malory

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

King Arthur at Parliament No. 22 – Arthur delivered unto Merlin

Arthur is delivered to Merlin

Arthur is delivered to Merlin

Pic: Explore Parliament

When Arthur was born, Merlin contrived that he should be passed over into the care of one of King Uther’s knights, Sir Ector.

Then when the lady was delivered, the king commanded two knights and two ladies to take the child bound in a cloth of gold. ‘And see that ye deliver him,’ he said, ‘to what poor man ye meet at the postern gate of the castle.’

-Malory

This is the 22nd part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

So the child was delivered unto Merlin, and so he bare it forth unto Sir Ector, and made an holy man to christen him, and named him Arthur.
– Malory.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

King Arthur at Parliament No. 21 – Arthur recognised as King

Arthur draws Excalibur

Arthur draws the Sword

Pic: Explore Parliament

After Uther’s death there appeared a Sword in a Stone in St Paul’s Churchyard at Christmas, and on it the inscription: ‘Whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone is rightwise king born of all England.’ The archbishop announced a tournament for New Year’s Day. This is the 21st part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

And so it happened that Sir Ector rode unto the jousts, and with him rode Sir Kay his son and young Arthur that was his nourished brother.
– Malory.

Sir Kay’s sword was lost, so he asked Arthur to ride back to the castle and bring another; but when Arthur arrived, everybody had left home to visit the tournament, so he decided to go and seize the Sword in the Stone.

‘For’ said he, ‘my brother Sir Kay shall not be without a sword this day’. So when he came to the churchyard Sir Arthur went to the tent, and found no knights there, for they were at the jousting; and so he handled the sword by the handles, and lightly and fiercely pulled it out of the stone… and rode away till he came to his brother Sir Kay, and delivered him the sword.
– Malory.

Sir Ector asked Arthur how he had got the sword. Arthur claimed to have pulled it from the stone without any effort. He demonstrated the deed in front of Sir Ector and the other knights.

Now, said Sir Ector to Arthur, I understand ye must be king of all this land. Wherefore I, said Arthur, and for what cause? Sir, said Ector, for God will have it so: for there should never man have drawn out this sword but he that shall be rightwise king of this land.
– Malory.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

King Arthur at Parliament No. 20 – Arthur Crowned King

Arthur is crowned King

Arthur is crowned King

Pic: Explore Parliament

At the feast of Pentecost all men cried at once ‘we will have Arthur unto our King’ and knelt before him.

And so anon was the coronation made, and there was he sworn unto his lords and the Commons for to be a true king, to stand with true justice from thenceforth the days of his life.
– Malory.

This is the 20th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

King Arthur at Parliament No. 19 – The Battaile with King Lot

The Battle with King Lot

The Battle with King Lot

Pic: Explore Parliament

Arthur strove to defend his kingdom from Saxon invasion and those who questioned his right to be king.  This is the 19th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

This is where the body of the post goes. Underneath is the standard advert for each post…

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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