Mar 01 2013

King Arthur at Parliament No. 24 – Arthurian Heraldry

Arthurian Arms

Arthurian Arms

Pic: Explore Parliament

This is the 24th and final part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.
The shields which run in a frieze around the Queen’s Robing Room purport to be those of Arthur’s Knights of the Round Table. Shields, each bearing unique arms, originally served the purpose of identifying, during the confusion of battle, the various knights who were concealed under the all-enveloping armour. These eventually became hereditary; and this kind of armorial tradition does not appear much before the 12th century.
Arthurian Arms

Arthurian Arms

Pic: Explore Parliament

Arthurian Arms

Arthurian Arms

Pic: Explore Parliament

However, as early as the sixteenth century it was felt that Arthur’s knights ought to be supplied with coats of arms just like their knightly equivalents of the day, and with the most scrupulous care arms were originated by the College of Arms for the knights of the Round Table. It is these which form the decorative frieze around the Queen’s Robing Room.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

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Feb 11 2013

King Arthur at Parliament No. 23 – The Birth of King Arthur in the Castle of Tintagelle

The Birth of Arthur

The Birth of Arthur

Pic: Explore Parliament

Uther Pendragon, father of Arthur, loved Igraine, wife of the Duke of Cornwall. Through the magic of Merlin he visited her in the likeness of her husband who she did not know was dead. She then married Uther, and the child she bore was Arthur.

This is the 23rd part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

‘Sir,’ said she, ‘the same night my lord was dead, there came into my castle of Tintagel a man like my lord in speech and countenance; and thus, as I shall answer unto God, this child was begotten’.
‘That is the truth’, said the king, ‘for it was I myself, and I am father to the child’.
– Malory

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 21 2013

King Arthur at Parliament No. 22 – Arthur delivered unto Merlin

Arthur is delivered to Merlin

Arthur is delivered to Merlin

Pic: Explore Parliament

When Arthur was born, Merlin contrived that he should be passed over into the care of one of King Uther’s knights, Sir Ector.

Then when the lady was delivered, the king commanded two knights and two ladies to take the child bound in a cloth of gold. ‘And see that ye deliver him,’ he said, ‘to what poor man ye meet at the postern gate of the castle.’

-Malory

This is the 22nd part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

So the child was delivered unto Merlin, and so he bare it forth unto Sir Ector, and made an holy man to christen him, and named him Arthur.
– Malory.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 21 2013

King Arthur at Parliament No. 21 – Arthur recognised as King

Arthur draws Excalibur

Arthur draws the Sword

Pic: Explore Parliament

After Uther’s death there appeared a Sword in a Stone in St Paul’s Churchyard at Christmas, and on it the inscription: ‘Whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone is rightwise king born of all England.’ The archbishop announced a tournament for New Year’s Day. This is the 21st part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

And so it happened that Sir Ector rode unto the jousts, and with him rode Sir Kay his son and young Arthur that was his nourished brother.
– Malory.

Sir Kay’s sword was lost, so he asked Arthur to ride back to the castle and bring another; but when Arthur arrived, everybody had left home to visit the tournament, so he decided to go and seize the Sword in the Stone.

‘For’ said he, ‘my brother Sir Kay shall not be without a sword this day’. So when he came to the churchyard Sir Arthur went to the tent, and found no knights there, for they were at the jousting; and so he handled the sword by the handles, and lightly and fiercely pulled it out of the stone… and rode away till he came to his brother Sir Kay, and delivered him the sword.
– Malory.

Sir Ector asked Arthur how he had got the sword. Arthur claimed to have pulled it from the stone without any effort. He demonstrated the deed in front of Sir Ector and the other knights.

Now, said Sir Ector to Arthur, I understand ye must be king of all this land. Wherefore I, said Arthur, and for what cause? Sir, said Ector, for God will have it so: for there should never man have drawn out this sword but he that shall be rightwise king of this land.
– Malory.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 13 2013

King Arthur at Parliament No. 20 – Arthur Crowned King

Arthur is crowned King

Arthur is crowned King

Pic: Explore Parliament

At the feast of Pentecost all men cried at once ‘we will have Arthur unto our King’ and knelt before him.

And so anon was the coronation made, and there was he sworn unto his lords and the Commons for to be a true king, to stand with true justice from thenceforth the days of his life.
– Malory.

This is the 20th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 10 2013

King Arthur at Parliament No. 19 – The Battaile with King Lot

The Battle with King Lot

The Battle with King Lot

Pic: Explore Parliament

Arthur strove to defend his kingdom from Saxon invasion and those who questioned his right to be king.  This is the 19th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

This is where the body of the post goes. Underneath is the standard advert for each post…

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Dec 28 2012

King Arthur at Parliament No. 18 – How King Arthur gate his Sword Excalibur

The Lady of the Lake

The Lady of the Lake

Pic: Explore Parliament

King Arthur lost his sword in battle with King Pellinore. He was severely wounded and so Merlin took him into the forest to a hermit who nursed him. In this forest they came upon a lake. Arthur told Merlin that he needed another sword, and Merlin told him that he should look into the lake. This is the 18th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

And in the midst of the lake Arthur was ware of an arm clothed in white samite, that held a fair sword in that hand; Lo, said Merlin, yonder is the sword I spake of. With that they saw a damsel going upon the lake.
– Malory.

Merlin announced that this was the Lady of the Lake. She came to Arthur and told him he could have the sword if he were to grant her a gift when she asked for it. Arthur accepted, and then a barge appeared on the water beside him. The Lady of the Lake instructed Arthur to take the barge and claim the sword.

So Sir Arthur and Merlin alight… and so they came to the sword that the hand held, Sir Arthur took it upon the handles, and took it with him. And the arm and the hand went under the water.
– Malory.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Dec 20 2012

King Arthur at Parliament No. 17 – King Arthur wedded to Guenever

The Wedding of Arthur and Guinevere

The Wedding of Arthur and Guinevere

Pic: Explore Parliament

There came a time when Arthur announced to Merlin that he needed a wife. He asked the old man for advice. This is the 17th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

Now is there any that ye love more than another. Yea, said King Arthur, I love Guenever, the daughter of King Leodegrance of the land of Cameliard… And this damsel is the most valiant and fairest lady that I know living, or yet that I could find.
– Malory.

And so Merlin went to King Leodegrance and told him of Arthur’s desire for his daughter. The King greeted the news with joy, and promised Arthur a gift – the Round Table. And so the King delivered his daughter Guenever to Merlin, and she and Arthur were married at the feast of Pentecost.

Then was the high feast made ready, and the King was wedded at Camelot unto Dame Guenever in the Church of Saint Stephen’s with great solemnity
– Malory.

Then all the knights were sworn of the Round Table, and the ceremony was repeated each year on the day of Pentecost.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Dec 12 2012

From Celtic Myth to the Historical Arthur, August Hunt uncovers it all

King Arthur Statue

King Arthur Statue

Pic:  Skinnyde

August Hunt published his first short stories in his high school newspaper, “The Wildcat Wire”. These were followed by stories and poems in “The Phoenix” literary magazine of Clark Community College, where he received a writing scholarship.

A few years after graduating with a degree in Celtic and Germanic Studies, he published “The Road of the Sun: Travels of the Zodiac Twins in Near Eastern and European Myth”. Leading magazine contributions include a cover article on the ancient Sinaguan culture of the American Southwest for Arizona Highways.

August has published four other books to date: “The Mysteries of Avalon: An Introduction to Arthurian Druidism”, “The Arthur of History: A Reinterpretation of the Evidence” , “The Real Moses and His God with A New Theory on Atlantis” and “Soulrender” (a novel). Here we take a look at some of the great scholarly work he has under-taken in his quest to explore the Arthurian Quest.

The Mysteries of Avalon

The Mysteries of Avalon is a unique and ground-breaking book which challenges many of the accepted views of the Arthurian tradition. From clues in old tales and documents, place-names and the mythic landscape, August Hunt weaves a tapestry of the Celtic gods and goddesses and of the Arthurian tales that heralds a new chapter in the interpretation of the deeds and existence of the greatest heroes of British legend – King Arthur and Merlin.Not only does the author place these figures in the British landscape, he also dispels many of the older inaccurate ideas about them and demonstrates which of their tales have been assimilated with other early sources to produce the popular images that exist today. By applying his wealth of knowledge and exploring the obscure and unresolved areas of the Arthurian tales, August Hunt provides new and provocative interpretations leading to startling conclusions about many subjects including the nature of Merlin, the dragon spirit of Britain, the real Holy Grail, the location of Avalon and the identities, human and divine, of the major characters in the Arthurian tales.
The Mysteries of Avalon

The Mysteries of Avalon

Pic: Stagspirit

Amongst these the author also focuses on the significant but often shadowy female figures of the myths like the Lady of the Lake, the mother of Arthur and the nine goddesses of Avalon. The quest for the hidden mysteries leads from Wales to Cornwall to Scotland, from Ireland to France to Italy, but most of all from the forgotten fragments of the past to the unfolding of the myths that dwell at the heart of the British psyche. The author includes fascinating appendices on a new interpretation of the Ogham alphabet and how to use it for divination, the symbolism and ritual uses of the Thirteen Treasures of Britain, and the zodiacal correspondences of King Arthur’s battles.

The book is available at Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

The Arthur of History

The Arthur of History

The Arthur of History

Pic:  Stagspirit

King Arthur dominates the mythic landscape of Britain, the Once and Future King who reigns in the psyche of the English and Welsh peoples. He is the “Shadow in the Mist” of British history and legends, glimpsed through numerous accounts, tales and place-names since his battles were first recorded in the 9th and 10th centuries in the ‘History of the Britons’ and the ‘Welsh Annals’. Cutting through centuries of arguments based on medieval romance and poetry, August Hunt presents a challenging and convincing argument for both the existence of a historical war-leader named Arthur and his presence on the borders of England and Scotland.He also examines and integrates the evidence for Irish influences in the tales and life of King Arthur. By thoroughly considering the place-names associated with Arthur’s battles and other significant sites such as towns and Roman forts, the author shows through onomastics, geography, archaeology and philology how they are all based on real historical places in northern England and southern Scotland.

Not only this, but they also point to both the location of Camelot and to Arthur’s final resting place of Avalon. From this basis, the author explores traditional genealogies, chronicles, myths and folklore to present the possible identities of the important figures of Ambrosius, Cunedda and Vortigern, as well as that of the hero who was transformed into a mythic leader exemplifying chivalric ideals and the hope of national rebirth.

The book is available at Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

Germanic/Norse Mythology and Religion

August is now exploring his fondness for the Norse Realms with The Terrible One’s Horse, a collection of essays on various aspects of Germanic/Norse mythology and religion. The study of Norse or Germanic mythology has long been the guarded province of scholars. Unfortunately, few breakthroughs in terms of new interpretations have been forthcoming in recent years. Neopagan groups referring to themselves as Asatruar, literally those who believe in the Aesir or “Gods”, have charted their own course in regards to deciphering the symbols and motifs found embedded in Norse myth, but these approaches, though admirable in intent, have often yielded wildly undisciplined or simplistic and naïve analyses. The present volume strives to achieve a “middle ground” between the severe strictures of academia and the ever-evolving and very individualistic belief systems of modern-day spiritual Vikings. It is with this goal in mind that the author presents twenty-six essays that he hopes will serve to fill the void in critical yet creative approaches to the unresolved problems posed by key elements of Norse myth.

The Terrible One’s Horse

August adds a note that:

This book is a collection of essays on various aspects of Germanic/Norse mythology and religion.  All were written in the past few years and although originally I did not intend for them to form a cohesive whole, it occurred to me recently that perhaps I should revise the earlier ones and polish the newer and then make all of them available in book form.  While the range of material is not entirely comprehensive, the different pieces of the whole do dovetail fairly well and all interrelate to each other on one or more levels.  There is some inevitable overlap, but I’ve tried hard to avoid excessive repetition or redundancy. It is my hope that anyone who has an interest in the subject, and in particular those who consider themselves adherents of the old Eddaic-derived faith, may enjoy and even appreciate some of the interpretations I offer. If any of my findings, no matter how theoretical they may be, actually benefit the reader, then my rationale in preparing this volume will have been amply justified.My only caution would be that this is NOT an introductory treatment of Norse myth. Some knowledge of the Eddas and related matter is assumed.

August Hunt
October 2012

The Terrible One's Horse

The Terrible One’s Horse

Pic: Stagspirit

The book is available at Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com.

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Dec 06 2012

King Arthur at Parliament No. 16 – King Arthur conquering the marvailous Gyant

King Arthur battles the Gyant

King Arthur battles the Gyant

Pic: Explore Parliament

Arthur was told of a giant who had murdered and devoured many of the people of Constantine, and who for seven years had slain all the new-born children of that land. So Arthur gathered two of his most trusty knights, Sir Kay and Sir Bedivere, and commanded them to follow him to revenge themselves upon the giant.

This is the 16th part in our series of animated/audio stories of King Arthur based on artwork found around the Houses of Parliament, courtesy of a wonderful Virtual Tour found at explore-parliament.net. We highly recommend you go to the Explore Parliament site to watch/hear the presentation about this artwork.

On arriving at the mountain they found the giant at his supper, sitting at a fire, gnawing on the limb of a man. And when Arthur turned he saw the bodies of twelve young children on spits over the fire. Horrified, he turned at once on the giant,

Therefore arise and dress thee, thou glutton; for this day shalt thou die of my hand. Then the glutton anon start up and took a great club in his hand, and smote at the king. And the king hit him again, and he carved his belly that his entrails fell down to the ground. Then the giant threw away his club, and caught the king in his arms so that he crushed his ribs.
– Malory.

The battle raged on, and the two tumbled down the mountain to where Sir Kay and Sir Bedivere waited, who at once rose to Arthur’s rescue.

Then when they saw the king fast in the giant’s arms they came and loosened him. And then the king commanded Sir Kay to smite off the giant’s head, and to set it upon a spear and bear it to Sir Howell, and tell him that his enemy was slain, and after let his head be bound to a barbican, that all the people may see and behold it.
– Malory.

See the animated story at explore-parliament.net.

[Source]

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

No responses yet

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