Jul 28 2013

Fascinating film – Is this a merman caught on camera?

Animal planet is displaying this video that was apparently caught by two scientists in a submersible and seems to show an underwater species that clearly has humanoid characteristics. Is this the original species that prompted the folklore of the Mermaid, or the Nereid or any of the Water Fae? According to NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) more than 95% remains unexplored. The oceans are the largest areas that remain unexplored on our planet and if any ground-breaking mysteries remain to be discovered, it is only reasonable to expect the ocean deeps to conceal them. Only recently, a mermaid was sighted off the coast of Israel and it seems that the fascination with these mysterious Fae is becoming stronger with each passing year.

The Mermaid in History

Mermaid by Alena Lazareva

Mermaid by Alena Lazareva

Pic: alenalazareva on deviantArt

A mermaid is a legendary aquatic creature with the upper body of a female human and the tail of a fish. Mermaids appear in the folklore of many cultures worldwide, including the Near East, Europe, Africa and Asia. The first stories appeared in ancient Assyria, in which the goddess Atargatis transformed herself into a mermaid out of shame for accidentally killing her human lover.

Mermaids are sometimes associated with perilous events such as floods, storms, shipwrecks and drownings. In other folk traditions (or sometimes within the same tradition), they can be benevolent or beneficent, bestowing boons or falling in love with humans.

Mermaids are associated with the mythological Greek sirens as well as with sirenia, a biological order comprising dugongs and manatees. Some of the historical sightings by sailors may have been misunderstood encounters with these aquatic mammals. Christopher Columbus reported seeing mermaids while exploring the Caribbean, and sightings have been reported in the 20th and 21st centuries in Canada, Israel and Zimbabwe. The U.S. National Ocean Service stated in 2012 that no evidence of mermaids has ever been found.

Mermaids have been a popular subject of art and literature in recent centuries, such as in Hans Christian Andersen’s well-known fairy tale “The Little Mermaid” (1836). They have subsequently been depicted in operas, paintings, books, films and comics.

The Celtic Mermaid or Selkie

Stories concerning selkies are generally romantic tragedies. Sometimes the human will not know that their lover is a selkie, and wakes to find them gone. In other stories the human will hide the selkie’s skin, thus preventing it from returning to its seal form. A selkie can only make contact with one human for a short amount of time before they must return to the sea. They are not able to make contact with that human again for seven years, unless the human is to steal their selkie’s skin and hide it or burn it.In the Faroe Islands there are two versions of the story of the Selkie or Seal Wife. A young farmer from the town of Mikladalur on Kalsoy island goes to the beach to watch the selkies dance. He hides the skin of a beautiful selkie maid, so she can not go back to sea, and forces her to marry him. He keeps her skin in a chest, and keeps the key with him both day and night. One day when out fishing, he discovers that he has forgotten to bring his key. When he returns home, the selkie wife has escaped back to sea, leaving their children behind.
Faroese stamp: the Seal Woman

Faroese stamp: the Seal Woman

Pic: Wiki

Later, when the farmer is out on a hunt, he kills both her selkie husband and two selkie sons, and she promises to take revenge upon the men of Mikladalur. Some shall be drowned, some shall fall from cliffs and slopes, and this shall continue, until so many men have been lost that they will be able to link arms around the whole island of Kalsoy.

Male selkies are described as being very handsome in their human form, and having great seductive powers over human women. They typically seek those who are dissatisfied with their life, such as married women waiting for their fishermen husbands. If a woman wishes to make contact with a selkie male, she must shed seven tears into the sea.

If a man steals a female selkie’s skin she is in his power and is forced to become his wife. Female selkies are said to make excellent wives, but because their true home is the sea, they will often be seen gazing longingly at the ocean. If she finds her skin she will immediately return to her true home, and sometimes to her selkie husband, in the sea.

Sometimes, a selkie maiden is taken as a wife by a human man and she has several children by him. In these stories, it is one of her children who discovers her sealskin (often unwitting of its significance) and she soon returns to the sea. The selkie woman usually avoids seeing her human husband again but is sometimes shown visiting her children and playing with them in the waves.

Selkies are not always faithless lovers. Peter Cagan and the Wind by Gordon Bok tells of the fisherman Cagan who married a seal-woman. Against his wife’s wishes he set sail dangerously late in the year, and was trapped battling a terrible storm, unable to return home. His wife shifted to her seal form and saved him, even though this meant she could never return to her human body and hence her happy home.

Some stories from Shetland have selkies luring islanders into the sea at midsummer, the lovelorn humans never returning to dry land. Seal shapeshifters similar to the selkie exist in the folklore of many cultures. A corresponding creature existed in Swedish legend, and the Chinook people of North America have a similar tale of a boy who changes into a seal.

Dylan, the Second Wave of Arianrhod

A legend similar to that of the selkie is also told in Wales, but in a slightly different form. The selkies are humans who have returned to the sea. Dylan (Dylan ail Don) the firstborn of Arianrhod, was variously a merman or sea spirit, who in some versions of the story escapes to the sea immediately after birth.

Dylan ail Don  is a character in the Welsh mythic Mabinogion tales, particularly in the fourth tale, “Math fab Mathonwy“. The story of Dylan reflects ancient Celtic myths that were handed down orally for some generations before being written down during the early Christian period by clerics. The story as it has been preserved will therefore exhibit elements and archetypes characteristic of both Celtic pagan and Christian mythologies. His name translates as “Dylan the Second Wave”, referring to him as being the second born (ail don meaning “second wave”) of Arianrhod.

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2 responses so far

2 Responses to “Fascinating film – Is this a merman caught on camera?”

  1. Jerome Trafnyon 28 Jul 2013 at 5:15 pm

    I think you need to keep it real and not post fictions. I agree that oceanic drilling is bad, but not in the name of any fiction.

  2. Garyon 29 Jul 2013 at 12:14 pm

    Hi Jerome,

    I think on the balance of evidence (after much googling of the individuals in the film and their respective histories), we decided that it was probably fake. The point made about oceanic drilling (or even the sonar scanning) and its effect on the environment is, of course, completely valid.

    However, we are story-tellers – we deal in fiction. We try to base our fictions in facts, and our minds are open enough to accept that there may be mysteries in the world as yet undiscovered!

    Many blessings

    Gary xxx

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