Archive for the 'Scotland' Category

Apr 01 2014

Prehistoric Scotland had links to lands overseas

Upper Largie Footed Food Vessel
Upper Largie Footed Food Vessel
Pic: Culture 24
Back in February 2008, Culture 24 reported on a discovery made in Upper Largie which provided exciting evidence of 4,000 year-old links between prehistoric Scotland and the Netherlands. Upper Largie is near Kilmartin in Argyll and Bute and the original excavations took place in 2005.

Analysis of the pots by Alison Sheridan, of National Museums Scotland, has revealed early international-style Beakers of the type found around the lower Rhine, which is the modern-day Netherlands and a strange hybrid of styles that suggest Irish and Yorkshire influences.

These finds are very rare.

said Martin Cook, the AOC Archaeology Project Officer, who oversaw the excavations in 2005.

I think there are three or four other examples that early in Scotland. We initially didn’t realise how unusual they were, as it is so unusual to find three beaker ceramic vessels in the same feature.

The actual structure was very unusual, there’s only been one other grave excavated like that in Scotland – you just don’t get features like that generally.

The excavations revealed two graves within a complex Neolithic and Bronze Age ritual landscape composed of monuments including an Early Neolithic cursus (long earthwork) and an Early Bronze Age timber circle.

The grave is so early and the style of ceramic is so rare for this period that it’s either an immigrant or a first or second generation descendant who still knows these techniques. The pots are made from local material which certainly suggests an immigrant or a second generation person.

Travel at this time would have been difficult with few established tracks and thick forests covering much of the British Isles – much of it populated by some dangerous wild animals. Seaward travel to or from Yorkshire and Ireland to pick up these influences would have been the slightly easier option.

I think it just re-emphasises the importance of Kilmartin as a centre during this time.

added Martin.

For more information about the work of AOC Archeology Group, see www.aocarchaeology.com

To read the full article, please go to Culture 24.

Originally posted 2009-12-23 08:24:22. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Mar 11 2014

Highland Folklore: The Secret Commonwealth Revisited


Study for The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania
Pic: Wiki
It is just over three hundred years since Robert Kirk, minister of Aberfoyle, died at the age of fifty two. But the question remains, did he really die or was he ‘taken’? Taken, that is, by the Good People, the elusive folk who lived under the earth in the green hills.The youngest and seventh son of James Kirk, Robert studied theology at St. Andrews and took his master’s degree at Edinburgh.

He became the minister of Balquidder and moved to Aberfoyle in 1685, having published a psalter in Gaelic the previous year. He had also been involved in preparing a Gaelic translation of the Bible.

We might expect a man of his background to have been a staunch supporter of established orthodoxy but this was no ordinary preacher. He recorded his thoughts in a manuscript dated 1691 entitled “The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies“.

Descriptions of the Faerie World

There is no mention of hell and damnation, just a fair and reasonable account of the unseen world. There is nothing sentimental in his writing, and those seers who had the ability to witness the people of peace regarded it as an affliction rather than a gift. The Tabhaiser, or Seer,

“is not terrified with their sight when he calls them, but seeing them in a surpryse (as often he does) frights him extreamly”.

These are clearly not the tinselled fairies of Victorian England but the wild and elemental spirits of nature.

Two ways of gaining the second sight are described. The first is to acquire a tedder (tether) of hair which has bound a corpse to the bier. With this wound round the waist one must stoop down and look back through the legs until a funeral passes. The alternative is to find an accomplished seer who will place his right foot over the candidate’s left and lay his hand upon his head. This confers the power to see and seems not unlike descriptions of admission to a witch coven.

Kirk’s account of the secret commonwealth combines the banal with the surreal. They live in houses underground that are large and fair, lit with lamps and fires but without fuel to sustain them. They may abduct mortal women to nurse their children. Their clothing and speech is that of the country they live in. Their life span is longer than ours, but eventually they die. They have rulers and laws but no discernible religion. Moreover, unlike us, they do not have a dense, material form but have, in Kirk’s words,

“Bodies of congealed Air”.

Every Quarter they travel to fresh lodgings, a reference perhaps to the elemental tides of the seasons.

It is possible that Kirk employed seers to give him information about the dark and silent world, just as Dr. Dee relied upon Edward Kelly a century before.

What really happened to Robert Kirk?

An odd story of what became of the minister of Aberfoyle remains. His successor, the Rev. Dr Grahame, describes how Robert Kirk was walking one day on a fairy hill. He collapsed and was taken for dead. After the funeral, his form was seen by a relative. The spectre urged him to go to their cousin Grahame of Duchray.

Kirk was, he explained, not dead but a captive in the elemental world. His widow was pregnant and he foretold that if Duchray came to the christening, he, Robert Kirk, would appear. Duchray must then throw his dirk over the head of the apparition. If this was done, Kirk would be freed.

Sure enough, the birth and the christening came. Grahame of Duchray was there, just as he had been bidden. During the ceremony the outline of the former minister could be seen. Duchray was so taken aback that he failed to throw the dirk. And the author of the Secret Commonwealth disappeared, never to be seen again

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s als found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

Originally posted 2012-04-01 13:53:57. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Jan 30 2014

Amazing website has over 30,000 Oral Records made in Scotland from 1930s onward!

Search Districts in Scotland

Search Districts in Scotland

Pic: Tobar an Dualchais

The Tobar an Dualchais (http://www.tobarandualchais.co.uk/#) website contains over 30,000 oral recordings made in Scotland and further afield, from the 1930s onwards. The items you can listen to include stories, songs, music, poetry and factual information. You can search their wonderful website using their interactive version of the Scottish Map pictured left. They say:Tobar an Dualchais/Kist o Riches is a collaborative project which has been set up to preserve, digitise, catalogue and make available online several thousand hours of Gaelic and Scots recordings. This website contains a wealth of material such as folklore, songs, music, history, poetry, traditions, stories and other information. The material has been collected from all over Scotland and beyond from the 1930s onwards.

The recordings come from the School of Scottish Studies (University of Edinburgh)BBC Scotland and the National Trust for Scotland‘s Canna Collection.

Please note that not all material from the School of Scottish Studies Archives is available on the website.

Examples from these collections include

  • Stories recorded by John Lorne Campbell on wax cylinders in 1937
  • Folklore collected all over Scotland by Calum Maclean in the 1950s
  • Scots songs recorded by Hamish Henderson from travelling people in the 1960s
  • Conversations recorded on Radio nan Gàidheal

Please note that the sound quality is variable on of some of the recordings due to the sound recording equipment available at the time.

The project will ensure that Scotland’s rich oral heritage is safeguarded and made widely available for educational and personal use for future generations.

[source]

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

Originally posted 2013-02-09 06:22:18. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Jan 26 2014

Celtic Religion in the Iron Age

Torcs
Pic: portableantiquities

Archaeologists, digging in the Iron Age earth of the Romano-British temple at Harlow, Middlesex, came across a gruesome reminder of Celtic religion in the shape of a coin. It showed the Iron Age chieftain Cunobelin on the obverse side, while on the reverse is the clear picture of a man, wearing an apron, but otherwise naked, holding aloft a human head.

There’s no question that there was the ‘Cult of the Severed Head,’ but we mustn’t be misled by Roman writers such as Strabo and Tacitus, the latter being otherwise fairly reliable. They both wrote about rites performed by the druids as being particularly bloodthirsty; human victims being stabbed in the back, and the Druids making divinations through their death throes.

Both these writers, and others as well, were writing for their readers. In other words, they wrote to titillate, to shock and to excite their Roman audiences, many of whom had appetites jaded from the sights they’d witnessed in the various arenas and circuses.

Certainly one of the most reliable of chroniclers was Caesar, but of course even he was guided by his Roman nature. Militarily, there was no-one to top him, but he did go a little bit off track with the druids. His readers, too, were urbane, so his writing does tend to be a bit coloured. However, he was certainly correct in reporting that the druids were powerful men, in authority in both religious and legal matters. He was right, as well, in saying that there was an arch-druid and that there were druidic schools where young men were taught what were, presumably, the mystic arts as well as the niceties of the law.

All this would be taught through word of mouth, since there was nothing written down in those times. If we look back to a previous article, we recall the feasts of Beltane and Samhain, to name but two. From whence did they come? They were ancient at the time of the druids, so it’s impossible to say what historical mists hid their origins. However, the severed head recurs time and again and was certainly some form of rite. It seems that it was considered by the Celts in the same light as we view the soul. Everything that made a person human resided in the head.

Water played a large part in Celtic and druidic lore. Skulls have very frequently been found close to, or actually in, water.

Skulls weren’t always associated with cults or religion. Celtic warriors were head-hunters who’d display the heads of their enemies above the gates of their hill-forts. A bloodthirsty relic was found at Stanwick in Yorkshire, the Brigantian stronghold. A skull with three wounds, one of which was fatal, had been hacked from the rest of the body at the fourth vertebra, and it still carried the pole on which it had been displayed. A sword and scabbard were found nearby.

There’s a growing belief among archaeologists that early Bronze Age Britain was ruled by a priestly caste that was responsible for the designs of the circles at Avebury, Stonehenge, Brodgar and Callanish. It’s suggested that this priesthood originated in Neolithic times and there are certain strong clues that the Celtic religion had its roots much earlier, in pre-history.

The oak tree was reverred by the druids, as was mistletoe. Pliny the Elder tells us that it was cut with a golden sickle by a white robed priest. After this, two bulls were sacrificed, all this done with great ceremony on the sixth day of the moon.

In conclusion, I think we have to assume that the religions of the Bronze and Iron Ages came from a time so distant in the mists of history, almost certainly from central and northern Europe

My thanks again to professor Lloyd Laing

This is Mike, delving into Celtic religion. I find it so fascinating to ponder on the origins of the Celtic religion, who was the priestly caste prior to the druids, and where did they come from? I do hope you found this article interesting. We’re working up to the chaotic period that ushered in Celtic barbarism at its worst. But more of this next time. Have you visited the Knight’s Site yet? If not, please try to take time to have look. I’m sure you’ll be interested in all that it has to offer.
http://www.theknightssite.com
mkbnd8@gmail.com

Author: Mike J. Bond
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Provided by: Cellphone news

Originally posted 2009-10-09 06:34:19. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Jan 26 2014

King Arthur was actually Arthur Mac Aedan, the sixth-century son of an ancient King of Scotland

Arthur's Excalibur

Arthur’s Excalibur

Pic: TSPL, The Scotsman

Author Adam Ardrey claims that instead of the romantic English king of legend who lived at Camelot – which is often said to be Tintagel in Cornwall or in Wales – Arthur was actually Arthur Mac Aedan, the sixth-century son of an ancient King of Scotland, whose Camelot was a marsh in Argyll. He claims that King Arthur was a Scottish, pre-Christian warlord whose remains are buried on Iona, according to the Scots historian’s new book.

He also suggests that Arthur pulled the sword Excalibur from a stone at Dunadd near Kilmartin, died near Falkirk and was buried on the Hebridean island of Iona, which he declares to be Avalon. Ardrey, an amateur historian who works as an advocate in Edinburgh and previously wrote a book claiming Merlin the wizard was actually a politician who lived in the Partick area of Glasgow, spent years investigating his theories and says that they can be proved “beyond reasonable doubt”. The assertions in his book Finding Arthur: The True Origins Of The Once And Future King are strengthened by the discovery in 2011 of what some experts believe is King Arthur’s round table in the grounds of Stirling Castle. Ardrey says he not only believes Arthur is buried in Iona but would love to see the site excavated to look for proof. He says:

The legendary Arthur is said to be buried in an island in the western seas – Avalon – but in the south of Britain there are no islands in the western seas. Iona fits all the criteria. It’s an island where hundreds of kings were buried. Some say 128. Other members of Arthur Mac Aedan’s family were buried there too. I say Arthur was also buried there.

Ardrey states that Camelot is a nondescript marshy area north of Dunadd, an ancient hill fort in ­Argyll, where the sword in the stone “scene” was enacted.

He said that he also believes Arthur’s 12 battles were fought on different sites across Scotland, including Stow in the Borders, where he says the Battle of Guinnion took place, and the Battle of the City of the Legions, which he says was fought on the site of the Roman fort of Trimontium in Melrose. He said:

The litmus test for Arthur is the 12 battles and the battle list. I was able to identify all of them geographically, as well as historically place them in context. Six of them are even in a straight line. Everything fits into context.

Trimontium, site of Roman Fort

Trimontium, site of Roman Fort

Pic: TSPL, The Scotsman

Many historians have attempted to link Arthur with Cornwall and Tintagel Castle, and in 1998 an ancient stone bearing a sixth-century inscription similar to the name Arthur was unearthed at the castle, the mythical birthplace of the legendary king. It was hoped that the discovery could prove that King Arthur had his headquarters at the site of the ruined castle on the north coast of Cornwall, but the findings – of a piece of slate inscribed with the name Artognov – Latin for the English name Arthnou – remained inconclusive. However, in 2011 it was believed that Arthur’s Round ­Table may have been ­unearthed by Glasgow University archaeologists investigating the King’s Knot in the grounds of Stirling Castle. The book also asserts that Arthur became the victim of an establishment conspiracy which was determined to recast him as an English Christian hero. It also claims that, as a Scottish man of the druidic “Old Way”, he was the last of his kind holding out against a zealous Christian onslaught. Ardrey said:

I am hoping the book provokes debate and discussion. But if I’m right, then 100 years of British history needs to be rewritten.

Read the full story at The Scotsman website.

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

iphone

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace in the US.

You can now also find the Windows 8 Phone App in the Windows 8 Phone Store.

Windows 8 Phone App

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 16 2014

He’s Big, Blue, and the Red-Headed Defender of the Clans! Saltire! Scotland’s First Superhero!

Saltire: Invasion

Saltire: Invasion

Pic: Saltire

You’ve heard of Captain America, the enhanced Super-Soldier who became the symbol of American patriotism and you may even have heard of Captain Britain, whose power derived in part from Merlyn and the mystical sword, Excalibur and who embodies the spirit of British patriotism but it’s now time to doff your cowls and pull on your capes, as the Superhero Spirit of the Ancient Clans becomes embodied in the Big, Blue form of Saltire! He embodies both the concepts of ancient mysticism along with all of the drama, power and heroism that you expect from any of today’s cinematic Superheroes. Saltire is an archetypal Golden Age comic book hero – the sort we see on our Movie screens today, and not the complex and often dark, anti-hero type that seem to dominate today’s comic book world. He is a Hero for a nation – a symbol to stand by, perhaps ideal for a time when Scotland is seeking its own individuality and independence again.
With John Ferguson as the writer, art by Tony Julskaer and Gary Welsh, the new graphic novel Saltire by DiamondSteel Comics hits the streets with twice the impact of those massive blue fists striking the legions of the Roman army as they threaten to cross onto Scottish lands. The first book is in two parts Saltire: Invasion – that tells of the coming of the Romans and Saltire’s role in driving them back and Saltire: Inception that gives us his origin story. In between the two we are treated to some beautiful concept art as well as some stand-alone colour pieces that are a pure luxury to see. His enemies are not just the ill-fated and mysterious 9th Legion of Rome, but the summoned Avatar or a Roman God! We even see the big, blue hand stretching as far as the Imperial throne of Rome to shake it up a bit.
Saltire in Action

Saltire in Action

Pic: Saltire

A Magical Blend of Celtic Mythology and Pseudo-History

Saltire and Swords

Saltire and Swords

Pic: Saltire

The creator, John Ferguson, describes Big Blue as

an immortal being created thousands of years ago to protect Scotland and its people. He’s big, he’s blue and he’s ginger. He has Scottish values but he’s a traditional comic book superhero with a variety of super villains to contend with as the story progresses, a Scottish competitor to Batman and Spiderman if you like.

He was born of the union between the Clans of the North, the Clans of the South and a Fey representative of the powers of Light and Darkness – Princes of the Otherworld! John has woven a unique blend of traditional mythology, modern cultural nationalism and the Heroic Ideal represented by classic Golden Age superheroes into Saltire, the personification of Scotland’s Stone of Destiny.

Whether or not you could count some of the more traditional heroes of Scottish Mythology, such as Finn McCool, as Scotland’s first Superheroes is really a moot point as they were the heroes from a different time and less likely to ‘leap tall buildings in a single bound’ or meet whatever scale you match a modern Superhero up to. Saltire’s passes all of the tests of our time and stands tall and proud (and blue) as the embodiment of the Spirit of Scotland’s Clans, its’ Otherworldly Spirit and History as well as the hopes for its future. Every bit the equal of a Captain America or Captain Britain!

Wielding twin Claymores made from indestructible, meteoric Diamond Steel, and dressed in trews and leg-wraps, our big, blue and hairy Defender is an imposing living, visual image of the Saltire symbol on Scotland’s flag – known as Saint Andrew’s Cross. A powerful cast comprised of the powerful and unique defenders of the 12 Clans – Scotland’s own version of the ancient 12 Tribes perhaps? – and united by the High Shaman promise great character development for the future.
Flag of Scotland

Flag of Scotland

Pic: Wiki

Saltire himself is accompanied by the earth-bound representatives of the Light and Dark Fey – the Dark Unicorn, Caledon and the Dragon of Light, Nathir who dwells within the waters of Loch Ness.

What may come in the future for Scotland’s National Superhero?

Like the ‘Once and Future King’, Arthur, who will awaken from his mystical sleep to defend the shores of Britain from her invaders, so will Saltire burst anew into life to defend the Clans and the Peace of the Land north of the Wall!

The Immortals

The Immortals

Pic: Saltire

So, anytime, from his Inception to our modern-day World we could see Big Blue leap into action. The story has started with the attempted invasion by the Romans and we are anxiously awaiting Book 3 of the Saga, Saltire: Annihilation, to see where the story goes. We were given a real treat with the beautiful artwork and presentation of the first two books bound as a single volume (also in hardback), and can only hope that such high standards continue. The characters are, obviously, only just starting out so I’m eager to see how the relationships pan out, especially with the mysterious and beautiful Fey lady, Eilys, who possesses the gift of foresight but cannot set foot upon the Earth. The Big Screen has seen the Big Green figure of the Hulk cause massive property damage; it has seen Big Red, Hellboy, fight against the unseen legions of the demonic and supernatural and maybe, just maybe, in the future we’ll see Big Blue being summoned from the Stone of Destiny to swing his Diamond Steel blades on the Silver Screen? Well, we can dream…

You can find out all about Saltire, John Ferguson and his team as well as where to get hold of the Graphic Novel on their website at http://www.diamondsteelcomics.com or track them down on Facebook (for some amazing reviews and artwork) or follow them on Twitter!

Remember keep it Big, Blue, and Ginger!

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

iphone

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace in the US.

You can now also find the Windows 8 Phone App in the Windows 8 Phone Store.

Windows 8 Phone App

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 08 2014

The Isle of Iona may be an ancient burial site

TyIona Bay at the Isle of Iona

TyIona Bay at the Isle of Iona

Pic: Wiki

An archaeological survey on the famous Scots isle of Iona – where St Columba landed 1450 years ago to spread Christianity in Scotland – has shown signs of ancient burials reports the Scotsman. This is the first geophysical investigation to be undertaken away from the core focus of the Columban monastic enclosure and the Benedictine Abbey. The surveys were carried out on National Trust for Scotland land on the island by Dr Sue Ovenden and Alastair Wilson of Rose Geophysical Consultants.

The pair examined two areas in the fields to the south of the village – one close to the current village hall and south of the Nunnery and the other at Martyr’s Bay. The area close to the village hall seems to show features of recent or natural origin which will be excavated later this year. However, the more interesting result came from Martyr’s Bay where there is a mound beside the road where skeletal remains were excavated in the 1960s.

Excavations

Derek Alexander, the Trust’s Head of Archaeology Derek, said:

The geophysical survey shows that on the landward side, this mound may have been revetted by stones and surrounded by a shallow ditch. This could be a sign of burials. It has always been suggested that there are numerous burial sites on Iona and there have been various finds over the years, the most famous of which is in the graveyard at Relig Odhrain to the south of the Abbey.

The burials that have been discovered so far are absolutely fascinating. For example, those unearthed by excavations at Martyr’s Bay in the 1960s were quite unusual – there were some 40 skeletons packed into an area about 4m long by 2m wide. These appeared quite jumbled and many may have been reburied, especially as the carbon dating showed that one skeleton dating from the 13 – 15th century was below one dating from the 6 – 8th century.

It’s possible that this mound has some connection to another graveyard that’s marked on an old map, known as Clad Nan Druineach. We plan to investigate the area further in September, and hope that the findings will add more to what we already know about this fascinating island’s cultural and spiritual story.

The findings are revealed as the island prepares for a special Service of Thanksgiving at Iona Abbey to mark the 1450th anniversary of Columba’s arrival on Iona.

Read more about the story and the service on The Scotsman website.

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

iphone

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace in the US.

You can now also find the Windows 8 Phone App in the Windows 8 Phone Store.

Windows 8 Phone App

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Dec 31 2013

Scotland’s first Celtic ‘Loch Village’ has been discovered

Loch Village at Black Loch of Myrton

Loch Village at Black Loch of Myrton

Pic: History Extra

The remains of an Iron Age ‘loch village’ have been discovered in south west Scotland reports History Extra. During a small-scale excavation of what was initially thought to be a crannog in the now-infilled Black Loch of Myrton, archeologists found a settlement of at least seven houses. AOC Archaeology Group, which worked on the dig along with local volunteers, discovered evidence of multiple structures making up a small village. What appeared before excavation to be one of a small group of mounds transpired to be a massive stone hearth complex at the centre of a roundhouse.

The timber structure of the house has been preserved, with beams radiating out from the foundation. The village, which covers an area 60m in diameter, is the first of its kind to be found in Scotland. The site has been radiocarbon dated to two phases of activity: one in the middle of the first millennium BC, perhaps in the 5th century BC, and the other in the last two centuries BC.

Graeme Cavers of AOC Archaeology, co-director of the site, said:

What is so exciting about this site is the fact that it has the potential to tell us how everyday buildings in Iron Age Scotland were furnished and used, how they were repaired and rebuilt and even what activities took place in different parts of each building. In Iron Age archaeology, for the most part we deal with dried out and decayed roundhouses that preserve very little of the original structure – generally only a few post holes or occasionally a hearth will survive.

At Black Loch of Myrton we have the posts that held up the building, as well as the reeds and branches used to floor and furnish the structure. Waterlogged wood also offers the opportunity to date the structure very accurately using dendrochronology – or tree ring counting – to give a date accurate to within a few years or even months, rather than the decades or centuries usually provided by radiocarbon dating.

Mr Cavers added:

We found a few fragments of a quern stone – used for grinding grain – as well as some fragments of pottery. Although these aren’t too spectacular of themselves, they tell us that the site was probably a domestic one and that the remains of everyday life are likely to be found there. Pottery is extremely rare in Iron Age Wigtownshire, so this may be an indication of how well preserved the site is.

The full article can be read on the History Extra site – let’s hope we hear more about this exciting discovery in the future!

———————————

You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

iphone

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace in the US.

You can now also find the Windows 8 Phone App in the Windows 8 Phone Store.

Windows 8 Phone App

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Dec 02 2013

21st Century Book of Kells



Close historical links between Ireland and Scotland will be celebrated in a new Irish publication dubbed a ’21st Century Book of Kells’.‘An Leabhar Mór – The Great Book of Gaelic’ brings together the work of 200 poets, artists and calligraphers from both countries.

It features colourful material from the sixth to the 21st centuries, including the earliest Gaelic poetry in existence.
Some 100 artworks used in the book have already toured five countries and have been seen by more than one million people.

Irish Gaels known as ’Scoti’ migrated into Scotland from the sixth century and gave the country their name.
The most famous artefact from Ireland’s golden age, the Book of Kells, was almost certainly begun on the Scottish island of Iona.

‘An Leabhar Mór’, which is edited by Theo Dorgan and Malcolm Maclean, will be launched tonight by Gaeltacht Minister Eamon O Cuiv in Dublin.

Publisher Ivan O’Brien of The O’Brien Press said:

Scotland and Ireland share a mythology, a rich music tradition, languages and history and we are honoured to celebrate that with the publication of this book.

The 100 Gaelic poems have been nominated by leading poets and writers such as Seamus Heaney, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill and Máire Mhac an tSaoi.

The 100 visual artists – 50 from each country – were commissioned to respond to the poetry in a variety of media and include work by Scottish and Irish artists Allan Davie, Will Maclean and Rita Duffy.

This is the first time the book has been published in Ireland.It was originally published in 2002 by Scottish publishers Canongate but has been out of stock for over two years.

The book is available here

Source

Originally posted 2008-10-02 09:08:06. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Nov 26 2013

World’s first bagpipe sheet music app!


Pipefest
Pic: Click to see App
Pipefest 1 is the World’s first bagpipe sheet music app! With sheet music for one hundred pipe tunes in a searchable index all in one place – the app is a great resource for pipers.

Features:

  • A collection of one hundred traditional and popular pipe tunes.
  • All tunes embedded within app – no further downloading.
  • Tunes indexed within time signature categories.
  • Search function to help quickly find tunes..

Benefits:

An app relevant to pipers
Convenient way to store and index tunes
Provides useful reference resource for pipers
Easy to use when out and about
Available via iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pipefest-1

 

App Store: Pipefest 1

For information on piping and drumming apps please contact:
Magnus Orr – magnus@pipefest.com

Momedia – events & media production Scotland

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Appbrain at http://www.appbrain.com/app/celtic-myth-show/tv.wizzard.android.celticmythpodshow841 or by using the QR code opposite.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

Originally posted 2011-09-15 17:57:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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