Archive for the 'Exhibition' Category

Feb 16 2013

Regaining a sense of ‘Clan’ at Clan Gathering


Halystorm’s Head
The Daily Pilot reports about the 76th Annual Highland Gathering and Festival at the OC Fair and Expo on Sunday, along with many other clans. What a day this must have been!Daniel Telford, the correspondent says:The weekend festival invited a number of the major Scottish clans that have representatives in the U.S. to have booths and inform the public about their heritage. The booths lined the streets of the expo, offering information, T-shirts, trinkets and the chance for some to trace their genealogy.

There were also Scottish bands and music, as well as boutiques and kilt stores.

One of the highlights of the festival was the Scottish athletics competition, as men tried to prove that some of the strongest are those wearing kilts. They competed in a number of events, including the caber toss, where contestants take a long log and launch it in hopes of turning the log end over end while keeping the log in a straight line.

Gary Herbold, a member of the Ferguson Clan, represents the Ferguson Clan at a number of Scottish Festivals across California and has been involved in Scottish events for nearly two decades. He said:

A lot of people that you get, it’s their first time. Their grandmothers or uncle was in [a particular clan] and they never thought much about it. They are usually very thrilled to tie something in their personal life to something bigger.

You can read more about the story here.

Originally posted 2008-05-31 13:08:15. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Feb 10 2013

Local school explores the Caerau Hill-fort in Cardiff

Children show model of Caerau Hillfort they helped to make

Children show model of Caerau Hillfort they helped to make

Pic: Your Cardiff

A school and community initiative that has fired up interest in Cardiff’s history and archaeology has showcased its work at St Fagan’s National History Museum reports Your Cardiff. The community exhibition Share Your Story was produced by children and community members from Caerau/Ely who have been working with Cardiff University’s School of History, Archaeology and Religion on the Caerau and Ely Rediscovering Heritage Project (CAER).

The exhibition will be a chance to discover more about the little known Caerau Iron Age Hillfort.

The 12-acre location of the hill fort was the subject of an excavation by the experts of Channel 4’s Time Team in April, when they found 3,000-year-old homes and artefacts.

About 90 pupils from Fitzalan, Mary Immaculate High and Glyn Derw took part in a range of activities, from Iron Age pottery workshops to the creation of archaeology themed eco-graffiti art and artefact analysis. Pupils and community members have also been directly involved in archaeological research, undertaking a geophysical survey of the site and participating in a recent televised excavation in conjunction with Channel 4’s Time Team.

And it’s not just the teenagers of Cardiff who are interested in the history of the area; Sheila Spinks, from Adamsdown, is part of the adult learners group and has discovered places in the city she never knew existed. The grandmother of five said:

It’s amazing and it’s been so informative. Last Saturday we went on walks to Tinkin’s Wood, St Ruthin’s, the Caerau hill fort and to a World War II decoy bomb shelter, it’s all been mind-blowing.

I love archaeology and it’s a really important part of Cardiff’s history.

The display of work by the pupils and adult learners will be on display at St Fagans National History Museum in July and August and will be going to the Cardiff Story Museum in the new year.

Read the full story on the Your Cardiff website.

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jan 08 2013

Visit Iron Age exhibits – 2 new Museum pieces

seahengte.jpg The famous timber circle dating back 4,000 years which was found in the sea off the Norfolk coast (England) is to return to the county in a permanent display. Seahenge, with 55 oak posts and a central upturned stump dating from the Bronze Age, was found emerging from a beach at Holme-next-the-Sea in 1998. Timbers were studied at the Bronze Age

Centre, Peterborough, then preserved at the Mary Rose Trust, Portsmouth. Next month Seahenge will go on display at the Lynn Museum in King’s Lynn.

After Seahenge was excavated, 3D laser scanning revealed the earliest metal tool marks on wood ever discovered in Britain. Archaeologists at the Bronze Age Centre, believe between 50 and 80 people may have helped build the circle, possibly to mark the death of an important individual. Seahenge became exposed at low tides after the peat dune covering it was swept away by winter storms.
Funding from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Norfolk County Council has been provided for the Seahenge Gallery project at the Lynn Museum which will house the timber, displayed in its original formation.

The central stump, which is still being treated, will join the gallery at a later date. The main display at the museum is mirrored by a full-sized fibreglass replica showing how the structure would have appeared when it was constructed in 2049 BCE, complete with a model of a Bronze Age man. Visitors can enter and explore this area.
Lynn Museum project manager Hannah Jackson said mystery still surrounds what prompted the Bronze Age people to create the circle.

“The upturned stump could have been like a table top on which the body of a very important member of the community who had died would be laid out for the birds and animals to pick the flesh off. Then they would remove the bones for burial elsewhere, and that fits in with what we know of Bronze Age burial rites,” she said.

John Gretton, of Norfolk County Council, said:

“Whilst the research done on the timbers has led to some historians drawing conclusions, the original function of Seahenge remains mysterious, and I hope that visitors will flock to the newly restored Lynn Museum to speculate on the ancient meaning behind the timbers – which we were able to rescue for all time from further damage.”

The museum opens Tuesday to Saturday, 10am to 5pm. Admission is £3 adults, £2.50 concessions and £1.65 for four to 16-year-olds.

Source

ironage_01.jpg A replica of an Iron Age roundhouse, created after extensive research on prehistoric sites at West Heslerton and Pickering, has been built at Ryedale Folk Museum, Hutton-le-Hole (North Yorkshire, England), and is expected to attract thousands of tourists this summer. The venture has seen teams of youths on the Community Pay-Back Scheme, five local schools, and scores of volunteers working on the project.

“It has been a real community project, ” said Bex Carver, the museum’s learning manager.

In addition to fitting out the roundhouse as it would have been in the Iron Age, the venture also has its own livestock. In the next few weeks a small flock of Soay sheep from the Orkneys will be lambing.

The project has also been given help under the Every Child Matters Campaign, and local teachers are being encouraged to use the roundhouse to provide pupils with ‘hands on’ history lessons, through placement sessions which are being arranged said Bex.

It is an educational resource centre which we feel will be invaluable to Ryedale schools in bringing history alive.

Source

Originally posted 2008-03-31 14:31:05. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Oct 12 2012

Archaeologists Discover Teutonic Army Massacred

Army sacrificed in a bog

Army sacrificed in a bog

Pic: Skanderborg Museum

 Science Nordic reports : A Danish bog has been harbouring a terrifying secret for thousands of years .Archaeologists have spent all summer excavating a small sample of what has turned out to be a mass grave containing skeletal remains from more than 1,000 warriors, who were killed in battle some 2,000 years ago.

“We found a lot more human bones than we had expected,”

says Ejvind Hertz, curator at Skanderborg Museum.

 

The discovery of the many Iron Age bones has attracted international attention, partly because the body parts are macabre per se, but also because the bones are surprisingly well preserved. Furthermore, the find confirms a Roman source’s description of the Teutons’ atrocious war practices.

The site is located in the Alken Enge wetlands near Lake Mossø on the Jutland peninsula.

Bones reveal wounds from weapons

Some 2,000 years ago, the Alken warriors are thought to have been sacrificed to some gods, which we’re not very familiar with today.

The bones ended up in the bog at a time when it wasn’t a bog; rather, it was a small basin by Lake Mossø, created by a tongue of land jutting into the lake.

The archaeologists have so far only excavated an area of 80-90 square metres, although the site stretches over an area of 3,600 square metres.

Excavations in wetlands are very expensive, since water needs to be constantly pumped out. Also, the finds are so densely concentrated that it takes a long time to get through all the layers.

The area that has so far been excavated contained bone fragments from around 240 men aged between 13 and 45. The men’s bones are marked by melee weapons such as swords and axes.

Meadow filled with dead warriors

The unexcavated basin in the bog stretches over a huge area covering almost 40 hectare and is believed to contain the remains of more than 1,000 warriors.

When asked how the archaeologists can tell that this many warriors are buried there, Hertz says: “We know that people who cut peat here in the 19th and 20th centuries found bone fragments. We’ve also made test excavations in the basin.”

This is the first time that something like this has been found in northern Europe.
Ejvind Hertz, curator at Skanderborg Museum

The archaeologists did not find complete skeletons, only skeletal parts. They can see that the bog contains many different individuals, since humans have, for instance, only one left thighbone.

Dead warriors were left to rot on the battlefield

The army beneath the bog may have been defeated and killed in a battlefield located far away from Alken Wetlands.

Hertz says that if this were the case, it must have been a massive logistical task for Iron Age people to transport the bones to the lake.

The researchers cannot say how this may have come about or where the battle took place. Many of the archaeological finds in the area stem from armies that came from afar.

But in principle, the battlefield may have been located right next to the sacrificial site. The sacrifice, however, occurred long after the battle.

“The bones have been sacrificed months or even years after the warriors were killed. We won’t know until the bones have been carefully analysed,”

says the curator.

One of the greatest historians of the Roman Empire, Tacitus (56 AD – 120 AD) described the aftermath of the Roman’s famous defeat in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in 9 AD.

“In the middle of the plain, bones lay either spread out or heaped, depending on whether they had fled or resisted. Next to the bones lay bits of spears and horse limbs, and there were also human heads nailed to trees. In the nearby groves were barbarian altars in which they had sacrificed tribunes and centurions of the first rank,”

Tacitus wrote in his Annals.

To  read more visit  Here

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

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Oct 03 2012

Scientists Find Ancient Burial Shroud Made of Surprising Material

The 2,800-year-old Lusehøj textile

The 2,800-year-old Lusehøj textile

Pic:  The National Museum of Denmark

Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience Senior Writer reports: 

Ancient scraps of fabric found in a grave in Denmark are not made of cultivated flax as once believed, but instead are woven from imported wild nettles, suggesting the grave’s inhabitant may have traveled far for burial.This discovery, announced today (Sept. 28) in the journal Scientific Reports, casts a new light on the textile trade in Bronze Age Europe, said study researcher Ulla Mannering, an archaeologist at the University of Copenhagen.

“Since the Stone Age, they had very well-developed agriculture and technology for producing linen textiles,” Mannering told LiveScience. “So it’s really unusual that a society which has established agriculture would also take in material from things that are not of the normal standardized agricultural production” — in other words, wild plants.

A luxurious shroud

The soft and shiny fabric dates back to between 940 B.C. and 750 B.C., making it about 2,800 years old. It was discovered in Voldtofte, Denmark, at a rich Bronze Age burial ground called Lusehøj. The Bronze Age ran from about 3200 B.C. to 600 B.C. in Europe.

The fabric was wrapped around a bundle of cremated remains in a bronze urn. It was a luxurious piece of material, Mannering said.

“The fibers we get from the European nettle are very, very fine and soft and shiny, and we often say this is a sort of prehistoric silk textile,” Mannering said. (Silk, made from insect cocoons, is known for its shimmery texture.)

Previous analysis pegged the Danish fabric as woven from flax, a plant widely cultivated in the region. But along with nanophysicist Bodil Holst of the University of Bergen in Norway, Mannering and her colleagues used advanced methods to reanalyze the scraps of cloth. By studying the fiber orientation as well as the presence of certain crystals found in plants, the researchers were able to learn that the fabric is not flax at all, but nettle, a group of plants known for the needlelike stingers that line their stems and leaves.

Nor is the nettle local, Mannering said.

Different soil regions contain different variations of elements. The variation of one of these elements, strontium, found in the fabric, was not local to Denmark, suggesting the plants the textile was made from grew elsewhere.

There are a few regions that match the strontium profile, the researchers found, but the most likely candidate is southwest Austria. The bronze burial urn holding the remains is from Austria, Mannering said, and it makes sense that the fabric might be too.

A well-traveled man?

Despite these imported grave goods, the remains appear to be those of a Danish man,

The personal objects in the grave, such as two razors, suggest he was a Scandinavian, albeit perhaps a well-traveled one. Maybe he died in Austria and was wrapped in this Austrian urn and Austrian textile and was brought back to Denmark in this condition and then put in a big burial mound,”

Mannering said.

 “The personal objects that were placed inside the urn together with this textile and the bones indicate that he is a male of Scandinavian origin, but it doesn’t mean that he couldn’t have died abroad.

Bronze Age Europeans lived an agricultural life and traded many goods with one another, especially the bronze that gave the era its name, Mannering said. The nettle fabric may have been an ancient luxury good for Bronze Age elite, It shows that they also knew how to get fibers from wild plants, and they wanted these fibers probably because of their very different and unique appearance.”

Researcher Ulla Mannering concluded.

Follow Stephanie Pappas on Twitter @sipappasor LiveScience @livescience  Facebook Google+

Source

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

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Sep 07 2012

Vikings invade Clontarf a second time

Clontarf Viking Day

Clontarf Viking Day

Irish Gathering 2013

The Irish Gathering website reports about a fun day in Clontarf in July. They say that the members of the Clontarf Business Association have come together in June over the last few years to highlight the reasons for shopping local in the Clontarf area of Dublin. This year was no exception and it was bigger and bolder than all previous years.

With the millennial celebration of the Battle of Clontarf peeping over the horizon, the festival was presented along with a full viking village, offering visitors a chance to see how people lived a thousand years ago. Stands re-enacted tradespeople at work, making coins, carving from wood, spinning yarn from raw wool and the village even had a herbologist, advising on natural methods and homegrown remedies to cure all ailments.

During the day children had a chance to spar like vikings and move in battlement formation with their viking leader instructing them on holding sword and shield and the correct positions of defence, upon being attacked by the enemy. The crowd were treated to a re-enactment of the Battle of Clontarf by the vikings themselves, during which the sound of metal against metal proved to be too much for many who were faint of heart.

Visit the Irish Gathering website for the full story and many more photographs.

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

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Aug 15 2012

South of England’s water site to rival Flag Fen site finally recognised

Shinewater Lake
Shinewater Lake

Pic: Gary
Ruthie and I are lucky enough to live within easy walking distance of some outstanding natural beauty. The beautiful Shinewater lake and its natural environs have been our strolling realm for quite a few years now. The large body of water, two lakes named Shinewater Lake and Hydneye Lake, are the homes to some incredible wildlife and the whole area was originally marshland criss-crossed by rivers and drainage ditches.

It was only after we had started the Show in 2008 that we began to learn much more about not only Celtic Mythology, but also the Ancient Celts and their predecessors – the Bronze Age dwellers on our shores, in fact, on our doorstep! We learned about the magical Flag Fen in Peterborough. Flag Fen is well known for its wooden causeways stretching across the marshland, its raised platforms and votive offerings. Put all of these together, along with the vast size of the site, and you have what is possibly the largest Sacred Water-site in England! Perhaps until now that is! :)

Birth of the Celtic Myth Podshow

In 2002, it was landscaped into the wildlife reserve that is now Shinewater Park. In 1995 some Bronze Age finds were discovered in the marshland, including a Bronze Sickle, and some water-logged wood whose importance we did not understand at the time.

Ruthie and I discovered that not only had similar causeways been found here at Shinewater, but that they were huge, often up to 8m wide! Several tracks were found leading in different directions, one major causeway leading towards Hastings. It is only if you are local that you’ll realise that the land between Eastbourne and Hastings is essentially marshland. We know it as Pevensey Marshes. It is more than possible that the archaeology of this whole area could reveal a sacred site that is larger than that of Flag Fen.

The Importance of the Site is finally Recognised

According to the Eastbourne Herald:

A former Bronze Age settlement in Eastbourne has been officially declared a scheduled monument by English Heritage.

The 3,000-year-old site at Shinewater is considered by experts to be among the best preserved Bronze Age wetland landscapes on the south coast.

In agreeing to schedule the site as an ancient monument, English Heritage concluded the area was of

“undisputed national importance as a rare site type with considerable archaeological potential”.

The scheduling was approved by the Minister for Tourism and Heritage.

The application was made by the county council archaeologist and supported by Eastbourne Borough Council.

Cllr Steve Wallis, portfolio holder for the environment, said,

“Everyone is absolutely thrilled such an important archaeological site, right here on Eastbourne’s doorstep, has been officially recognised as a scheduled ancient monument.”

While the site is largely unexcavated, a large and valuable assemblage of organic and inorganic cultural artefacts was discovered in 1995 during construction of flood alleviation ponds.

The excavation that followed the initial discovery opened up a 50m section of the platform and in 1996, a 60m length of trackway.

A superbly preserved complete bronze sickle with a wooden handle is on permanent display at the British Museum in London.

The site was occupied approximately 3,000 years ago and remains at the site indicate contacts by sea with the continent.

For more details email any questions to localhistory@eastbourne.gov.uk

This news article can be seen in their archives on the Eastbourne Herald website.

Call for Research, Funding and Exploration!

Now we have found out that they discovered Bronze Axes and many other extremely rare artefacts as well as the amazing sickle (now residing in the British Museum). One of the most important facts observed about these items is that they were high-status, expensive items that bore no signs of use. Such items deposited in water are almost universally seen as offerings to the Gods. All of this goes to back up the assertion that site was a sacred site, even though the single dig they undertook revealed an amazing platform-dwelling, a lake-house.

Whilst we recognise the importance of flood-control, which is the purpose of the lakes, why cannot Eastbourne Council be as long-sighted as Peterborough’s council? At Flag Fen, they have made a huge tourist attraction and education resource out of the archaeology that is there, and although the site has its own issues (lack of funding, drying out etc.) – they are going a long way to maximise what they have. Here, in Eastbourne, with a site that is potentially equally important, if not more, we are thankful that the site has finally become recognised and urge the local Council to invest in the local economy by developing and exploring the site in much the same fashion as they have done at Flag Fen!

Thank you for reading :)

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

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Aug 03 2012

William Wallace letters going on show in Edinburgh


The letter was written by King Philip of France, in 1300
Pic: BBC  Scotland

A pair of letters directly connected to Scottish revolutionary Sir William Wallace are to be displayed side-by-side for the first time in Edinburgh.

A 700-year-old letter from King Philip of France will be seen alongside the famous Lubeck letter, next summer.

Wallace led the Scots to a key victory over English forces at Stirling Bridge in 1297, as part of a struggle for independence.

He was hung, drawn and quartered for high treason in 1305.

The dates and venue for the exhibition are still to be confirmed.

The letters are the only two documents directly associated with Wallace.

A year after his arrival in France to ask for support against King Edward of England, Philip wrote to his agents in Rome in 1300 about Wallace.

The document, often seen as grant of safe passage for Wallace, was actually a request from the King of France for Pope Boniface VIII to give his support to the Scot.

The letter, currently held by the National Archives in London, suggests Wallace intended to visit the papal court, but it is not known whether he reached Rome.

William WallaceWilliam Wallace was executed in 1305, for high treason
Scottish Culture Secretary Fiona Hyslop said:
“This exhibition is of tremendous importance – seeing the only two surviving documents directly connected to William Wallace side-by-side will be a unique experience.

“It is likely to give us a new perspective on Wallace’s vital role in Scottish history.

“The letter from the French king has been the subject of much speculation since it was discovered in the Tower of London in the 1830s. I am delighted that it is to be brought to Scotland next year and look forward to seeing it on public display with the Lubeck letter.”

The National Records of Scotland will borrow the letter from 2012-14, while talks on keeping it in Scotland are ongoing.

The Lubeck letter was sent by Wallace in the wake of his victory at Stirling Bridge, to inform European trading partners that Scottish ports were once again open for business.

Both letters are fragile and can only go on display under controlled lighting for a very limited period every few years.

Source

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

 

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Appbrain at http://www.appbrain.com/app/celtic-myth-show/tv.wizzard.android.celticmythpodshow841 or by using the QR code opposite.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

Originally posted 2011-09-20 07:50:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Aug 03 2012

Exhibition of ‘head-survey’ photos to determine origins of Irish race

Anthropometry in Inishbofin

Anthropometry in Inishbofin

Pic: The Board of Trinity College Dublin

An exhibition called ‘Irish Headhunters’, opened on May 3 2012 in the Blasket Island Centre in Dunquin, County Kerry, will shed light on turn of the century anthropology World Irish tells us. The exhibit is drawn from a collection of images collected by anthropologist Charles R. Browne from Dublin who surveyed communities in the remotest parts of Ireland from 1891 to 1900.

The image above, shows Browne and a fellow researcher measuring the head of a local man on Inishbofin. Beginning in the 1890s, Browne began to systematically record the people on Ireland’s remote islands. He used anthropological methods of the time, specifically ‘craniometry’ (measuring of the skull), to “racially classify” his subjects.

The photographs of this research were filed in a series of albums, six of which survive and are held in the Library of Trinity College Dublin. A selection of these photographs are being exhibited for the first time ever with the permission of the Board of Trinity College Dublin.

Those in charge of the exhibition gave some insight into the way the anthropologists used craniometry in a recent interview with the Irish Times:

Sliding rules, steel tapes and “craniometers” were used to gauge the circumference of the heads of his often unwilling subjects: methods that seem repellent to modern sensibilities, as Jane Maxwell says in the catalogue.

“Alive or dead, the head of the Irish peasant was a source of intense interest to Browne and his associates,” writes curator Ciarán Walsh in his introduction.

“The taking of skulls recorded in the photographs and ethnographies makes the evidence of headhunting in the west of Ireland the most striking aspect of the albums.”

From Irish Times

Read the full story on World Irish

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You can also now download a Celtic Myth Podshow App from the iTunes store. This is the most convenient and reliable way to access the Celtic Myth Podshow on your iPhone or iPod Touch. You’re always connected to the latest episode, and our App users have access to exclusive bonus content, just touch and play! To find out more visit the iTunes Store or our Description Page.

You can now also find an Android version of the App which works identically to the iPhone version. You can find it on Handster at http://www.handster.com/celtic_myth.html or by using the QR code opposite. It’s also found on the Opera Marketplace as well as AppBrain in the US.

If you come to the site and listen or listen from one of our players – have you considered subscribing? It’s easy and you automatically get the episodes on your computer when they come out. If you’re unsure about the whole RSS/Subscribing thing take a look at our Help page.

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Jul 27 2012

A National Day of Wales will be replanting its daffodil roots on March 3rd 2013

 St David’s Day Poster Pic: Festival Site The Los Angeles St. David’s Day Festival will be taking place on March 3rd in 2014 at the Barnsdall Art Park in Los Angeles. They tell us that the National Day of Wales celebrates Welsh and Welsh American culture through live performance, workshops, children’s education, language classes and vendor marketplace. Our goal is to raise awareness about Welsh and Welsh American identity and encourage continued growth between the United States and Wales.

The festival is to celebrate Welsh and Welsh American identity and expression. In doing so, it fosters positive self-esteem and creativity for the benefit of the greater community. The public will be encouraged to participate in classes and attend performances in the Welsh tradition. Welsh Americans will benefit from learning about their culture through ongoing workshops and activities.

 Location, location, location!

2013 Los Angeles St. David’s Day Festival – National Day of Wales
Dydd Gwyl Dewi Sant, Los Angeles – Diwrnod Cenedlaethol Cymru
March 3, 2013
Barnsdall Art Park, 4800 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA, 90027

Inside the Barnsdall Gallery Theatre there will be a special ticketed St. David’s Day Grand Concert beginning at 1:30pm with a Druid blessing, followed by a screening of the rare 1962 short film ‘Dylan Thomas’ starring Richard Burton. After this the Welsh Choir of Southern California (Côr Cymraeg De Califfornia) will take the stage, and then a special performance by Paul Child, and in her debut North American appearance – Welsh soprano and harpist Siobhan Owen!

We are all excited by the return of Paul Child to Hollywood. Among his many achievements, Child is Wales biggest independent selling artist, the ‘Official Voice of Welsh Rugby’, and recently sang at the half time show of the final match of the Wales Rugby Grand Slam. Interesting to note, each time he’s sung before a match, Wales has registered a victory.

Siobhan Owen was born in North Wales to a Welsh father and Irish mother, and moved to Australia when she was 2 years old. A classically trained singer from the age of 9, Siobhan also turns her haunting soprano voice and gentle harp playing to a repertoire of traditional Celtic songs. She has received prestigious awards for both her classical and Celtic singing and is a popular performer at festivals, concerts, recitals etc around Australia.

Outside the Grand Concert beginning at 10am visitors will be delighted in a free Celtic Marketplace, authentic Welsh food, languages classes by Swansea based instructor Jason Shepherd of the Learn Welsh Podcast, workshops, Welsh Corgi lecture, Kids Crafts at the Odgen Nash Children’s Area, and the LA Eisteddfod featuring poetry, storytelling, readings and performance at the Harold Lloyd Outdoor Stage. Also we will be promoting artists from both Wales and the US in a special book release party on Welsh Nursery Rhymes collected and translated by Llanelli born author Peter Anthony Freeman and published by A Raven Above Press.

The last Welsh festival in LA brought over 2,000 attendees with famous celebrities including Frank Lloyd Wright’s grandson and Henry Thomas (star of Legends of the Fall and ET). There is really no better place to celebrate the history and accomplishments of Welsh-Americans then at Barnsdall Art Park. Designed by Welsh-American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the park is nestled atop a shaded hill and away from the city bustle, with a clear view of the Hollywood sign in Griffith Park (named for Welsh philanthropist Griffith J. Griffith) and near the infamous Gower Street to the west (known for the golden age of cinema and Welsh-American stars like Glenn Ford and Myrna Loy).

Learn Welsh Podcast

Swansea based Jason Shepherd of the Learn Welsh Podcast returns to Los Angeles to teach free beginner Welsh classes at the 2013 St. David’s Day Festival – National Day of Wales on March 3, 2013!Jason Shepherd creates and hosts The Learn Welsh Podcast, a fortnightly audio podcast that teaches people the Welsh Language. The Podcast’s website is for the listeners (as well as any other Welsh learners), to come together and share their learning experiences.
Jason Shepherd for Learn Welsh Podcast Pic: Festival Site

The site also focuses on history and culture of Wales and to practice writing and speaking in Welsh with other learners. Jason is also an accomplished author and artist that enjoys painting the Gower Peninsula and other scenic Welsh areas. Jason Shepherd is the owner and operator of Choir of Giants Press, a small press focused on Welsh and other Celtic related books.

For more information about The Learn Welsh Podcast goto: http://www.learnwelshnow.com/

The Schedule

For tickets and more information goto: http://www.aravenabovepress.com/
or contact Lorin Morgan-Richards (Festival Executive Director)
at lorinmorg at aol.com

Tentative Schedule (may be subject to change)
Harold LLoyd Outdoor Stage
10:00am – Reading by R. Merlin of Ariel & Electra
11:00am – Aedan MacDonnell performs
12:00pm – Joe Praml reads Dylan Thomas and other Welsh favorites
1:00pm – Segni Pembroke Welsh Corgi lecture
-visitors invited to Grand Concert

Harriet Beecher Stowe Classroom
10:00am – Learn Welsh Podcast Welsh language pt.1
11:00am – Peter Anthony Freeman reads from the book on Welsh Nursery Rhymes (Hwiangerddi Cymraeg)
12:00am – Learn Welsh Podcast Welsh language pt.2
1:00pm – Peter Paddon workshop
-visitors invited to Grand Concert

Grand Concert in the Barnsdall Gallery Theatre
1:30pm Druid Blessing
1:45pm Screening of Dylan Thomas (1962) directed by Jack Howells and starring Richard Burton
2:15pm The Welsh Choir of Southern California (Côr Cymraeg De Califfornia)
3:00pm Performance by Paul Child
4:00pm Performance by Siobhan Owen

Ogden Nash Children’s Learning Area
Create your own Daffodil or Leek with artist Rochelle Shelly Rosenkild
& Welsh Choir chorister Caroline will facilitate Ysgol Eisteddfod (School Eisteddfod) to help the youth activate and develop their vocal talents in the arts of poetry, song, comedy and storytelling and their artistic and craft skills! If you weren’t born of Welsh heritage you’ll leave being The Cymry-Mabwysiad (Welsh by adoption).

There will also be a presentation of artwork from Wales and US in the limited edition artist book on Welsh Nursery Rhymes published by A Raven Above Press – collected and commentary by Peter Anthony Freeman and artwork by: Judy Adamson, Gaabriel Becket, Adrien Burke, John Charles, Kerry Evans, Nichola Hope, Sarah Hope, Rhys Jones, Robert Karr, Brian Kenny, Xavier Lopez Jr., Jo Mazelis, Anthony Richards, Lorin Morgan-Richards, Siobhan Owen, David Richardson, Grasiela Rodriguez, Rochelle Shelly Rosenkild, Jason Shepherd, Danny Walden, Michele Witchipoo, Kimberly Wlassak, and more!

Official Major Sponsors include A Raven Above Press, National Welsh-American Foundation, Tom LaBonge 4th District Councilmember

Community Sponsors include Cambrian Heritage Society Madison WI, AmeriCymru, The Welsh Baker, Learn Welsh Podcast, Ninnau & Y Drych, The Celtic Arts Center, Brian Kenny (Dark Corner of the Abyss), Music Wales, Highland Sun, Eugene Hayden, Queens Favor, Red Dragon Management, Choir of Giants Press.

Friend Sponsors include Jude Johnson, Peter Anthony Freeman, The Order of Bards Ovates & Druids, Pan Pipes Magickal Marketplace, Emily Fromm, The National Library of Wales, Celtic Myth Podshow, JOMO – Joanne Morrison. — with Brian Kenny, Welsh Choir, Siobhan Owen, Jason Shepherd, Paul Child and Joe Carbone.

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