Celtic Myth Podshow News

Bringing the Tales and Stories of the Ancient Celts to your Fireside

The Fairy Flag Of Clan MacLeod

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Many, many years ago, the Chief of Clan MacLeod was a handsome, intelligent man, and all the young ladies in the area were very attracted to him, but none suited his fancy.
One day, he met a fairy princess, a bean sidhe, one of the Shining Folk. Like all the other females he met, she fell madly in love with him, and he with her.

When the princess appealed to the King of the Fairies, for permission to marry the handsome Chief, he refused, saying that it would only break her heart, as humans soon age and die, and the Shining Folk live forever.

She cried and wept so bitterly that even the great King relented, and agreed that she and the Chief could be hand-fasted for a year and a day. But, at the end of that time, she must return to the land of Fairie and leave behind everything from the human world. She agreed, and soon she and the young MacLeod were married with great ceremony.

No happier time ever existed before or since for the Clan MacLeod, for the Chief and Lady MacLeod were enraptured of each other totally. As you might expect, soon a strapping and handsome son was born to the happy couple, and the rejoicing and celebration by the Clan went on for days. However, the days soon passed and a year and a day were gone in a heartbeat.

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Exit Doctor Who – Enter Merlin!

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Felix in his wonderful Gaming Blog, tells us that straight after the final episode of Doctor Who the BBC ran a (very) short trailer which basically consisted of the following screen. He also found two Guardian news artciles that reveal some interesting facts.

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OM to Ogham

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OM to Ogham: Guest Blogger Robert Baird

Plato observed that the advent of an alphabet making writing efficient for average people actually lead to less knowledge or disciplined communication. We need not blame the Phoenicians for this because people really could benefit from writing.

John Locke and many other scientists during the time when man thought there was some reality in prejudices like The Scale of Nature observed that language was a pre-requisite for consciousness. Although there is some truth in his observations which include the Tabula Rasa, this is pure hogwash and perhaps even worse than that. He may well have sought to make people feel inferior just as that Scale of Nature was designed to do to so many non-Europeans!

Common sense is a most uncommon thing it appears. We still have many people living under the pall of the Bible Narrative and other absolute religions (Fukayama and social engineers know how to use) which have whole histories of deceit woven into their dogma and the laws that form the structure of our society. I am all for the Kat-ma concept of Karma which would have these social engineers meet their maker and put an end to that Dog-ma. It is unfortunate that scholars who are interested in making a living often have to go along with things they know are only half true at best. It is more unfortunate that good money can be made debunking real scholarship and exploration by the likes of Barraclough Fell and other Epigraphists. Please take a look into Rob Gombach of Utah State University as he says Fell was only a hobbyist.

The treatment of the concept of OM by the Catholic Encyclopedia is a fine example of what is wrong with our society I think.

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Traditional Irish Music and Instruments

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Traditional Irish Music and Instruments

Traditional Irish Music and InstrumentsPaul Murphy from Murphy of Ireland has given us a superb infographic about the development of Irish Music from the earliest times up until today’s modern mainstream Celtic music. This fantastic information can either be found as a single graphic for printing onto poster-sized classroom paper or section by section in the article below.

The Celts 500 BC to the Ruling Chieftains 10th to 17th Centuries

Traditional Irish music is an oral tradition whose origins can be traced back to almost 2,000 years ago when the Celts last arrived in Ireland. The Celts were established in Eastern Europe since 500 BC and were heavily influenced by the music of the East. It is speculated that the Irish Harp originated in Egypt.

The Celts 500 BC to the Ruling Chieftains 10th to 17th Centuries
During the later period, the harp was the dominant Irish instrument. All harpists were professional musicians employed by the ruling Chieftains under a patronage system to create and perform music for them.

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Waulking the Cloth – An Ancient Tradition

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Fulling, milling, or Waulking (in Gaelic luadh) is the technique of finishing the newly-woven cloth by soaking it and thumping it rhythmically to shrink and soften it – all done by hand in the old days. The songs served to keep the rhythm and lighten the work.

Waulking was the final stage in the long, laborious process of producing homespun cloth.

When the cloth comes off the loom it is stiff and harsh, and the weave is quite loose. Waulking thickens and softens it.

The cloth was soaked in what we call “household ammonia” (stale urine!) This useful chemical, known in Gaelic asmaistir, helped make the dyes fast, and to soften the cloth.

Waulking songs in Gaelic Culture

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Celtic Ritual Stone causes Anger in Galway

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The Irish Times reports that a community in Co Galway is outraged that a 2,000-year-old ritual stone is to be moved and taken to a museum. Minister for the Environment John Gormley has been asked to intervene to prevent Turoe Stone from being moved to Galway City Museum.

The three-foot high oval granite monument was erected near a ring fort at Kiltullagh over 2,000 years ago and was moved a short distance to Bullaun, a few miles north of Loughrea in mid-Galway, about 150 years ago.

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Irish Colony in North America Nearly 500 Years Ago

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A long overlooked report made to the King of Spain in 1521 provides an eyewitness account of an Irish province on the coast of South Carolina. The description of its culture seemed so absurd to scholars, not familiar with Irish history that it was ignored during the following five centuries . . . until now, reported the examiner in 2011.

First Spanish attempt to colonize North America

The year 1521 AD was one of the most important in the history of Spain. In 1519 Hernán Cortés had led a band of 550 conquistadors and sailors into the heart of the Aztec Empire, in violation of orders from the Governor of Cuba, Diego Veláquez, In January 1521 he began a siege of the three Aztec capital cities of Texcoco, Tlatalolco and Tenochtitlan. The Aztecs had been greatly weakened by European plagues. Cut off from food supplies and potable water for weeks, Tenochtitlan, one of the largest cities in the world, fell. The incalculable amount of gold and silver in Mexico soon made Spain a super-power.

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Icelandic Elves determine Road Planning Decisions

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  Merkurgata, Hafnarfjörður In a street named Merkurgata in Hafnarfjörður, just outside Reykjavík, is an elf rock that extends far into the street, narrowing it rather dangerously for passing vehicles. It was spared during the development of the area. Icelandic Elves.

Merkurgata, Hafnarfjörður
In a street named Merkurgata in Hafnarfjörður, just outside Reykjavík, is an elf rock that extends far into the street, narrowing it rather dangerously for passing vehicles. It was spared during the development of the area. Photo by Svala Ragnars

Icelanders’ belief in elves is playing havoc with planning laws and building projects, as rocky homes for the ‘hidden people’ become protected. Called Huldufólk, which means ‘the Secret or Hidden People’ in Icelandic, these Elves are considered to often have rocky homes that need protection or preservation – or disaster may swiftly follow those who disturb their homes. According to these Icelandic folk beliefs, one should never throw stones because of the possibility of hitting the huldufólk. Icelandic gardens often feature tiny wooden álfhól (elf houses) for elves/hidden people to live in. Some Icelanders have also built tiny churches to convert elves to Christianity. President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson has explained the existence of huldufólk tales by saying: “Icelanders are few in number, so in the old times we doubled our population with tales of elves and fairies.” [wiki]

Respect the Icelandic Elves – or else!

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “In Iceland, ‘respect the elves – or else’” was written by Oliver Wainwright in Reykjavik, for The Guardian on Wednesday 25th March 2015 07.00 UTC

Huddled together amid the jagged rocks of the Gálgahraun lava field, a group of nervous onlookers wait with bated breath. Suddenly, there’s a loud crack and a tumble of stones as a 50-tonne boulder is wrenched from the ground, then slowly raised into the air and eased down nearby, so delicately you’d think it was a priceless sculpture. “I just hope they’re happy in their new home,” says Ragnhildur Jónsdóttir. “The elves really don’t like being uprooted like this.”

Road-builders are used to seeing their plans scuppered by the protected habitats of bats and newts, or sites of special scientific interest and outstanding natural beauty. But in Iceland, there is another hindrance: the world of the huldufólk, as they call them, the hidden people.

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Two Iron Age Trumpets played for the first time in 2,000 years!

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John Kenny and Simon O’Dwyer play two reproduction Loughnashade trumpets for the first time in over 2,000 years at the Organological Congress in Pourtugal 2013.

The Loughnashade Iron Age Trumpets are similar to the Celtic Carnyx

The Celtic carnyx was also made of bronze, and was used as an instrument of war during the Iron Age (c. 300 BCE – 200 CE). It consisted of a cylindrical tube about 2 metres long; the bell was elaborately carved to resemble a wild boar’s head, with a movable tongue and jaw; the mouthpiece was curved.

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Beachy Head Lady proves Iron Age Britain was multi-ethnic

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An exhibition exploring the origins of ancient skeletons in Sussex, including a woman from sub-Saharan Africa buried in Roman times, has opened reported the BBC in Feb 2014. The face of the so-called Beachy Head Lady was recreated using craniofacial reconstruction.

Eastbourne Borough Council’s museum service was awarded a grant of £72,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund for the Eastbourne Ancestors project. The aim was to identify the gender and age of each skeleton in its collection.

Detailed scientific analysis of more than 300 skeletons of people who lived in the south of England thousands of years ago has undertaken by scientists and archaeologists.

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